Basra: What really happened

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Basra: What really happened

Postby antiaristo » Sat Jan 14, 2006 1:00 pm

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Basra: What really happened <br>By Terri Judd <br>Published: 14 January 2006 <br><br>The young soldiers in flames jumping from their Warrior vehicles into a seething crowd provided some of the defining images of British troops' tour of duty in Iraq. <br><br>More than any other moment since the official start of "peacekeeping", it brought home the reality faced by troops in an increasingly turbulent nation.<br><br>The Defence Secretary, John Reid, was quick to play down the severity of the clashes last September. It was merely a "limited", controlled event against a small crowd, the Ministry of Defence said. The minister offered reassurances that none of the soldiers was seriously injured and would be back on duty soon.<br><br>But an investigation by The Independent has revealed that the violence was much more widespread and one of the youngest soldiers in the Warriors that day is still in hospital four months later, suffering from terrible burns. Nineteen-year-old Pte Karl Hinett is still undergoing treatment for 37 per cent burns.<br><br>Many were horrified to see images of Sgt George Long, his body in flames, jumping from the turret. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>However, what the images failed to show was that Pte Hinett was still in flames inside the Warrior armoured vehicle. The severity of his injuries has never been revealed and even many of his fellow soldiers in the Staffordshire Regiment were not told</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->. One said yesterday that he was devastated when he bumped into him recently while visiting a friend at Selly Oak Hospital in Birmingham.<br><br>"I went outside for a smoke and saw a woman, probably his mother, walk by with a lad. I didn't know it was him," he said. "I didn't recognise him but I know the way he walks. He walked over to me and I looked in his face. He didn't have any nostrils, no eyebrows, his lips had melted, his skin had melted on his face. He was in bits. I looked at him and I didn't know where to put myself. I was gutted."<br><br><br>On 19 September last year, soldiers from the Staffordshire Regiment and Coldstream Guards were sent out on to the streets to try to rescue two SAS men who had been taken prisoner. The situation erupted as petrol bombs were thrown at their vehicles.<br><br>The Government insisted that events were of "limited significance"and involved 200 protesters.<br><br>However, according to sources spoken to by The Independent, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>as many as 200 troops were dispatched to deal with the situation</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->. Those on the ground that day put the number of protesters at nearer 1,000, with at least nine Iraqis shot dead. All day, in intense heat, the fighting continued. As many as three Warriors were in flames.<br><br>One soldier said: "The first place we went, we were told the SAS were in a different location. The next minute, there was a big crowd in the streets. It was just hairy. It just happened so quickly. There were bricks, blocks and petrol bombs. There hadn't been anything like that before."<br><br>Dr Reid said at the time: "I am pleased to say that they are being treated for <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>minor injuries only</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> and are expected to return to duty shortly." Within days, four soldiers were brought forward to prove the point.<br><br>Sgt Long said: "My back was on fire. It was basic panic, I needed to get out of the turret and get the flames put out." He had, he added, gone back to check that his colleague was being looked after before going off to deal with the riot. "It wasn't that bad," the soldiers said.<br><br>Almost a week later, Army officers revealed that a soldier had been flown home with serious injuries contrary to the official line and that civilians had, in fact, been killed.<br><br>"At first, no one realised there were any serious injuries," said one private. "There was too much confusion. You didn't have time to think about it.<br><br>"But later we found out Karl [Hinett] had been flown home. When I saw the others on the news with their little injuries, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>I couldn't believe they put them in the paper and not Karl."</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>Pte Hinett, from Tipton, West Midlands, was known as a man who liked to keep fit, listen to rock music and receive cakes from his girlfriend back home. Now he has burns across his body and has had to undergo at least three operations.<br><br>Yesterday his family insisted he remained loyal to his regiment and was grateful to the Army for the high level of care he had received since returning.<br><br>One said: "His face is a lot better. We don't know when he will be out of hospital. Not always, but sometimes, he is in high spirits. He just wants to get back to work."<br><br>While the deaths of 98 servicemen in Iraq has been well documented, the military has been at pains to say little of those who have received crippling injuries. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>More than 4,000 have been flown home for medical treatment</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> though the MoD insists the majority were people who had fallen ill.<br><br>A spokesman said: "None of the soldiers involved in the incident on 19 September had life-threatening injuries and all received the medical treatment necessary. The Army takes its responsibilities towards officers and soldiers very seriously, particularly when they are injured during the course of duty."<br><br>But Sue Smith, whose son, Pte Phillip Hewett, 21, was one of three Staffordshire soldiers killed by a roadside bomb last July, said: "People should realise it is not just 98 dead. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>There are a lot of very serious injuries. Basically they are the forgotten soldiers of the Iraq war. The Government thinks ignorance is bliss. If you keep people in the dark, they won't ask questions</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->.<br><br>"<!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>What chance do the British public get to make a decision when everything is hidden? Why are they hiding it? If I know all about 12 [people] who have lost limbs and arms, why don't the public know? There are people who have lost eyes, people who are paraplegic, people with head injuries, people with burns."</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br>One of Pte Hinett's regiment agreed: "I was at the medical centre one day. I had just come off QRF [quick reaction force]. Four snatches [armoured Land Rovers] pulled up.<br><br>"Three blokes were carried out, brought in on stretchers. There was blood everywhere, all over the floor. It may me feel sick. They had shrapnel wounds to their legs and arms. An IED [roadside bomb] had gone off. People are not told what is happening to our blokes out there."<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> <br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://news.independent.co.uk/world/middle_east/article338500.ece">news.independent.co.uk/wo...338500.ece</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br><br>I like this bit<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The Army takes its responsibilities towards officers and soldiers very seriously, particularly when they are injured during the course of duty<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>They even sound like Americans now. <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=antiaristo>antiaristo</A> at: 1/14/06 1:56 pm<br></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby OnoI812 » Sat Jan 14, 2006 3:45 pm

Isn't that just like the pommie Brits <!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>It was just hairy. It just happened so quickly. There were bricks, blocks and petrol bombs. There hadn't been anything like that before."<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Totally disregard history and past experiences when it comes to violating Sovereignty.<br><br>Just think if Hinett had studied about what happened to Wellington and Pakenham's troops in New Orleans, he might have had some idea about autonomy and self determination of people when you disregard laws and piss them off. Such a shame, he may not be in his present predicament... <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=onoi812>OnoI812</A> at: 1/14/06 12:55 pm<br></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby antiaristo » Sat Jan 14, 2006 5:04 pm

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Just think if Hinett had studied about what happened to Wellington and Pakenham's troops in New Orleans, he might have had some idea about autonomy and self determination of people when you disregard laws and piss them off. Such a shame, he may not be in his present predicament...<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> <br><br>Ono, yeah, that's the point behind the secrecy isn't it?<br>"My country right or wrong" works so long as the people don't know how wrong.<br>I live in Spain. I have no more compassion for a British squaddie than for a member of the resistance. To be honest I feel more for the Iraqi victims. But that's hard to say if you live in the beligerent nation.<br><br>The British Establishment wanted this war. Articles like this are important to remind us all that the price is NOT being paid by the likes of Euan Blair, or Prince William, or Prince Henry. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby marykmusic » Sun Jan 15, 2006 3:41 am

Yeah, don't forget, y'all are in this too.<br><br>And don't forget that those SAS dudes that were rescued, had been spies. Working undercover. Dressed like Iraquis, found with explosives in their car... wonder if they were trying to set some poor Iraqi up as a suicide bomber? --MaryK <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby antiaristo » Sun Jan 15, 2006 6:14 am

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Yeah, don't forget, y'all are in this too.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>'Fraid not.<br>When I found out what a sack of shit had taken over, back in '94, I did something about it.<br>I wrote to the queen and repudiated the crown.<br><br>I have the acknowledgment.<br><br>I'm Irish. We've got neutrality in our Constitution. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby greencrow0 » Sun Jan 15, 2006 6:16 am

Before Iraq became occupied by the US....the UK became occupied by the US. The world just didn't know it.<br><br>The UK is the biggest aircraft carrier in the US fleet.<br><br><!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>Rule Britannia<br><br>Britannia rules the waves<br><br>Britons never, never never<br><br>Will be slaves!</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--> <p></p><i></i>
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Iran 'Stand Off'

Postby Byrne » Sun Jan 15, 2006 7:58 am

<br>I bought the Independent this Saturday. Alongside the article 'Basra - What Really Happened (reproduced in the first post here) was <br><!--EZCODE LINK START--><a href="http://news.independent.co.uk/world/middle_east/article338501.ece" target="top">_this article_</a><!--EZCODE LINK END--><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>British troops could be victims of Iran's nuclear stand-off with West</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> <br><!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>By Kim Sengupta <br>Published: 14 January 2006</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--> <br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Iran could take retribution against British troops in Iraq</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> if the British government continues with its leading role in the campaign against the country's nuclear programme, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>senior defence sources have warned</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->. <br><br>The Tehran regime is known to have immense influence with the Shia militias in Iraq and has been accused of directing their violent campaigns.<br><br>America and Britain have, in the past, charged Iran with involvement in the supply of explosives used to kill British soldiers in Iraq, although a recent review of intelligence has failed to show a direct link between the bombings and the Tehran regime.<br><br>The Iranians are also suspected of involvement in "death squads" responsible for the torture and murder of suspected insurgents.<br><br>Iraq's Interior Minister, Bayan Jabr, has been accused of links with the death squads - charges he denies. Mr Jabr is a former commander of the Shia Badr Brigade, which was formed in exile in Iran during Saddam Hussein's regime.<br><br>In Basra, the capital of the British-controlled south of the country, the police force has been heavily infiltrated by the Badr Brigade. They are believed to have been responsible for the abduction of two British special forces soldiers who had to be rescued with the storming of a police station.<br><br>A defence source said: "<!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>It is logistically eminently possible for Iran to take action against British and other coalition forces in Iraq.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> They have a lot of control over Shia forces and it is a leverage they are prepared to use, as we have seen already.<br><br>"It does not even have to be military action for the Iranians to retaliate. We may well see an upping of destablisation efforts if Britain is seen to be leading calls for sanctions. This is something we recognise and we are preparing to meet if necessary."<br><br>Meanwhile, another senior military figure, Admiral Sir Alan West, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>the head of the Royal Navy, warned that any military action against Iran could have "horrendous consequences" and "must be avoided".</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>Sir Alan said even air strikes - let alone a full-scale invasion - would be extremely problematic and could have "disastrous" results. Sir Alan was the first Western military commander to express his disquiet over the possibility of an armed intervention in the growing crisis over Iran's nuclear programme. It came amid reports that the US and Israel may bomb the nuclear facilities if Tehran refuses to back down from its belligerent stance over its nuclear testing, despite international anger.<br><br>Admiral West said: "The consequence of military action would be quite horrendous. We should not do it, the matter should be resolved some other way."<br><br>Talking about a previous example - an Israeli strike at Iraq's nuclear plant at Osirak in 1981, Admiral West said: "That was just one target. With Iran you have got to get every single one. There will awful repercussions if that does not happen." <hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br>This news story is preparing the public mindset for the likely 'incident' which will caue the retalliation measures against Iran. <br><br>Watch the story unfold in the next 46 days (till 23/3/06 when the Iranian Oil Bourse is set to open) where a similar spin story to the (non-existant) WMD's in Iraq will unfold and will sway the public, via MSM reporting, that action MUST be taken.<br><br><!--EZCODE UNDERLINE START--><span style="text-decoration:underline"><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>The Hegelian Principle</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--></span><!--EZCODE UNDERLINE END--><br>1. Create the problem<br>2. Generate opposition to the problem. (Fear. Panic. Hysteria)<br>3. Offer the solution to the problem created in step one!<br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby OnoI812 » Sun Jan 15, 2006 10:57 am

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Before Iraq became occupied by the US....the UK became occupied by the US. The world just didn't know it.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Before the US occupied Europe...The US became occupied by bankers and lawyers under the control of "The City of London". <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby scollon » Sun Jan 15, 2006 11:37 am

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The UK is the biggest aircraft carrier in the US fleet.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Absolutely true and Germany the biggest army camp. That's why Orwell called Britain 'Airstrip One' in 1984. The capital of Oceania was New York if I remember.<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Britons never, never never Will be slaves! <hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>All the more reason to bring the traitors to trial. I mean Thatcher, Major and Mandelsson. Putting dumb animals like Blair, Brown and Blunkett in jail would just be cruel.<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The US became occupied by bankers and lawyers under the control of "The City of London". <hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Very true, Britain has probably more or less controlled America at least financially almost since day one. However in the 1970s something changed, the UK was bankrupted by the global oil scam and the Neocons were born out of the primeval slime.<br><br>The Neocons have controlled Britain since Thatcher and their base of operation is the United States even if their home is Israel. <br><br><br> <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby antiaristo » Sun Jan 15, 2006 11:57 am

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Rule Britannia<br><br>Britannia rules the waves<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>I prefer<br><br><!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>Britannia waives the rules</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--><br><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Britons never, never never<br><br>Will be slaves!<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> <br><br>Oh yeah? It's MUCH worse in the United Kingdom<br><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>The politics of paranoia <br><br>Nobody is off limits in the Prime Minister's war on terror. Now he wants to dispose of the 'Wilson Doctrine' and bug his own MPs. But does the state need more power to spy on us? Francis Elliott reports <br><br>Published: 15 January 2006 <br><br>A Prime Minister deeply distrustful of many of his own MPs, intent on fighting a war with the "enemy within". Parallels between Tony Blair and Harold Wilson have been charted before. The news that Mr Blair is preparing to ditch his predecessor's pledge never to tap the phones of Britain's MPs suggests that <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>the current occupant of No 10 has less regard for constitutional niceties.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> <br><br>Mr Blair knows that bugging elected representatives will be fiercely opposed by many in Parliament but is confident he can argue the case over their heads that nothing - and no one - should be off-limits in the fight against terrorism. "Let no one be in any doubt," he declared in <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>the wake of the London bombings,</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> "the rule of the game are changing."<br><br>In truth, say critics, <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>the rules have been changing ever since Mr Blair became PM</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> and he has overseen a massive expansion of the state's capacity to spy on private individuals. There can be little doubt that, over the past eight years, technology and new legislation have significantly increased the security services' capacity to peer into our lives.<br><br>From the dramatic expansion of DNA and other databases to the multiple surveillance applications of satellite technology and new powers to read emails and texts, little now remains obscured from official snooping. Indeed, the Prime Minister recently boasted that he had "doubled the capacity" of MI5 in recent years.<br><br>Mr Blair has used the threat of international terrorism or crime to justify every reduction of civil liberty while pledging the safeguard of democratic oversight. Now even that oversight is under attack as the 40-year-old convention that MPs' communications should not be intercepted is to be torn up.<br><br>The history of how the Wilson Doctrine came into existence helps to explain why senior MPs and constitutional experts are so concerned at its imminent demise.<br><br>In late 1966, in the midst of the Cold War, Wilson had been forced on to the defensive after his extraordinary attack on the organisers of a seamen's strike, among whom was a young John Prescott. Challenged to justify his claim that the union was being manipulated by a "tightly knit group of politically motivated men", Wilson hinted at intelligence supplied by MI5.<br><br>It caused an uproar, and MPs demanded to know whether their phones were being tapped. On 17 November Wilson appeared in the Commons to give a statement that has been endorsed by every subsequent Prime Minister - until now. Wilson said there "should be no tapping whatsoever" of MPs' phones and that if it was considered necessary to change the policy, the Commons would be told.<br><br>Wilson said that he understood the "seriousness" of concerns, "particularly if tapping comes to be developed in this country on the scale on which it has developed in other countries". He could have little conception about the "scale" of interception technology 40 years on, nor how much the state could know about the lives of its citizens.<br><br>As detailed on this page, the scope for surveillance is increasing rapidly thanks to satellites, scanners, CCTV, information sharing and, shortly, ID cards. The legislative framework for this spying boom is laid out in the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (Ripa) 2000, which was supposed to reconcile new methods of snooping with human rights.<br><br>New watchdogs were created supposedly to ensure that the security services kept within the rules. But, ironically, Mr Blair says it is one of the new regulators who is pressing for the change to the Wilson Doctrine. In an almost unnoticed Commons statement last month, the PM said that <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Sir Swinton Thomas</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->, the Interception of Communications Commissioner, had written to him saying that Ripa's "regulatory framework" had "possible implications" for the ban on tapping MPs' phones.<br><br>Most ministers and officials involved in the issue believe, however, that it is Mr Blair who is most keen to sweep away what he believes is a <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>"Cold War anomaly".</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>The doctrine has come close to being breached on a number of previous occasions. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Two years ago, for example, it emerged that it clearly does not extend to Sinn Fein's elected representatives.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>Gerry Adams revealed that a listening device had been planted in a car used by him and other senior party figures. Eliza Manningham-Buller, head of MI5, was later reported to have privately admitted that the security services planted the bug. <!--EZCODE FONT START--><span style="font-size:small;"><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>However, since Mr Adams refuses to swear an oath of allegiance to the Queen, he is not formally an MP - and is therefore considered fair game by the snoopers</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->.</span><!--EZCODE FONT END--><br><br>It is incidents like this that lead experts such as Peter Hennessy, professor of contemporary history at Queen Mary, University of London, to believe that the doctrine is scrupulously observed by the security services at all times. Nevertheless, he says he finds it "pretty odd" that the Government is preparing to dismantle it.<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Only Mr Blair's sternest critics</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> would suggest that he is motivated by anything other than a desire to give to the security services everything they say they need to tackle terrorism.<br><br>The problem, as seen by champions of Parliament such as Labour MP Andrew Mackinlay, is who is to watch the watchers. "Governments can never be trusted on their own not to confuse national interest with what is in their political interest," he says.<br><br>Additional reporting by Glen Kristensen and Sara Newman<br><br>Big Brother Blair and the war on terror<br><br>CCTV BRITAIN<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>A fifth of the world's CCTV cameras are in the UK</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END-->, and the average person is caught on film 300 times a day. Britain's <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>four million cameras</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> cover almost every town centre, and the numbers are growing. Each year, an estimated £300m is spent on CCTV. The London bombings demonstrated their advantages to spectacular effect, but Liberty wants clearer controls to ensure information is not misused.<br><br>PHONE TAPPING<br><br>In 1997, there were 1,712 warrants allowing phone taps. In 2003, there were 4,827, about two and a half times the total when Labour came to power. The increase is more stark given that the rules have changed so warrants are issued against individuals, not communication providers, such as BT. Investigators used to need separate warrants. Now the Home Secretary need sign just one to intercept all communications.<br><br>DNA DATABASE<br><br>More than 5 per cent of the UK population - about three million people - are registered on one of the world's largest DNA data-bases. Anyone arrested can be sampled and permanently entered into the National DNA Database. Prosecution is not a condition for inclusion. About 140,000 people on it have not been charged or cautioned for an offence. <!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Some 37 per cent of black males are on the register, and 9 per cent of white men.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>SPIES IN THE SKY<br><br>Trials have started in Yorkshire of "tag-and-beacon" road pricing technology. Similar trials are to be held in London soon, possibly to replace the system for the congestion charge. But the real surveillance advance will come with satellite road pricing. Fitting tracking devices in cars to replace road tax with variable charges will also help the security services pinpoint details of every road journey made in Britain.<br><br>ID CARDS<br><br>ID cards are scheduled to come into use in 2008, subject to parliamentary approval. More than 50 pieces of information relating to the holder, including biometric information (iris patterns, fingerprints), will be on the cards. The Government says they will be invaluable in the fight against terrorism, organised crime and benefit fraud. Checks against a compulsory identity register are to be offered to private firms.<br><br>SPIES ON THE NET<br><br>The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 gave police and security services powers to monitor websites and intercept emails. The legislation provides for heavy penalties for failing to surrender passwords or encryption keys<!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>. Internet service providers are responsible for the installation of remote-controlled black boxes that relay all data passing through their computers to MI5.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--><br><br>TRAFFIC TAGGING<br><br>Details of every car numberplate, including date, time and location, are to be stored for at least two years, whether the owner has committed an offence or not. A control centre, which opens in April, can process and track 50 million plates a day. Plans are in place to enable 100 million a day, with records stored for five years. Commuters using London's Oystercard are providing a detailed record of their movements each day.<br><br>BODY SCANNERS<br><br>A millimetre wave machine, or "body scanner", is being tested on Heathrow Express commuters at Paddington. The scanner, a 7m-long steel box, creates a virtual image of people inside. An operator views this on a screen and can see any concealed objects. Critics say, aside from privacy, the health and safety aspects of such devices are unknown, because the technology is similar to that used on mobile phone masts.<br><br>CHILD TAGGING<br><br><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>Details on England's 11 million children are to go on an electronic database along with information on their families.</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--> Teachers, social workers and others working with children can access it. Set-up costs are estimated at £224m, and annual running costs £41m. Critics say the index will capture information on almost every child, except those most likely to be at risk. Trials suggest even schools have several addresses for some children.<br><br>NHS DATABASE<br><br>The NHS is compiling a database of medical history on all patients. Inclusion is not compulsory, but patients must actively opt out or it will be assumed they have opted in. The records would allow huge improvements in patient care, but the NHS is under pressure to allow the security services access to private medical data. <!--EZCODE FONT START--><span style="font-size:small;"><!--EZCODE BOLD START--><strong>It is believed MI5 has already asked to view the database</strong><!--EZCODE BOLD END--></span><!--EZCODE FONT END-->.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--> <br><br><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK START--><a href="http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/politics/article338692.ece">news.independent.co.uk/uk...338692.ece</a><!--EZCODE AUTOLINK END--><br><br>And all for the sake of one stinking, rotten, disgusting family of freaks! <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=antiaristo>antiaristo</A> at: 1/15/06 9:01 am<br></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby scollon » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:10 pm

antiaristo<br><br>You're Irish (like John Lydon) and live in Spain. So what is the big deal with the British Royal family ?<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>Gerry Adams revealed that a listening device had been planted in a car used by him and other senior party figures.<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Oh dear, MI5 are spying on their own agents, that <!--EZCODE ITALIC START--><em>is</em><!--EZCODE ITALIC END--> bad.<br><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>It's MUCH worse in the United Kingdom<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>No, just slowly catching up with the USA, it will still take another 30 more years to dumb te education system down to American levels. That's the most powerful political weapon there is. The NSA and CIA are way ahead of British capability.<br><br>Britain does seem very keen on cameras, I'll give you that. <br><br>I have no doubt that both the USA and its British colony are preparing to go to effective martial law as soon as they can. It's all there ready to go now.<br><br> <p></p><i>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p216.ezboard.com/brigorousintuition.showUserPublicProfile?gid=scollon>scollon</A> at: 1/15/06 9:13 am<br></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby antiaristo » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:36 pm

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>You're Irish (like John Lydon) and live in Spain. <hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>I'm ANGLO-Irish, my friend.<br>I was born in London. That means, to quote the Act of Settlement<br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>the laws of England are the birth-right of the people thereof, and all the Kings and Queens, who shall ascend the throne of this Realm, ought to administer the government of the same according to the said laws, and all their officers and ministers ought to serve them respectively according to the same<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Now you told me you had read the Vampire of Finance thread. What is there you don't understand?<br><br>If you want full chapter and verse I suggest you have a look in Data Dump at Please do not Post and Second Batch.<br><br><br><!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>So what is the big deal with the British Royal family?<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>I'm funny that way.<br>I don't like having death squads sent after me.<br>I don't like losing my children.<br>I don't like having my home stolen.<br>I don't like having my career destroyed.<br>I don't like being a refugee these last eleven years.<br>I don't like being left to die or kill myself.<br>I don't like the way she uses the Treason Felony Act to trump any and every law on the statute book.<br>I don't like the way she used the Treason Felony Act to lie the people into war.<br>And I don't like the way she puts foreigners into the High offices of England.<br><br>Is that good enough for you? <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby scollon » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:41 pm

<!--EZCODE QUOTE START--><blockquote><strong><em>Quote:</em></strong><hr>I'm ANGLO-Irish, my friend<hr></blockquote><!--EZCODE QUOTE END--><br><br>Are you a British citizen, if so the neutrality statement was a bit strange. <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby antiaristo » Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:52 pm

Not quite sure what you mean by that.<br><br>When I repudiated the crown I gave up my British NATIONALITY (you're not citizens, by the way, you're subjects).<br>Never again did I use my British passport.<br>When the passport expired I did not renew.<br><br>I was lucky, for literally weeks before the Anglia crimes I'd applied for an Irish passport. It arrived on June 10 1994.<br><br>Most Brits are not so lucky.<br><br>My formal legal status is Freeborn Englishman and Citizen of Ireland.<br>The old fuckface has NO LEGAL CLAIM ON ME! <p></p><i></i>
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Re: Basra: What really happened

Postby scollon » Sun Jan 15, 2006 1:02 pm

Weren't the Anglia crimes down to Archer and other criminal elements that are common to that level of any society. Aren't most consrvative politicians bare faced crooks ?<br><br>I'm thinking Cheney, Rumsfeld and the Bushes etc. <p></p><i></i>
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