Died-Walter Cronkite "most trusted CIA man in America&a

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Died-Walter Cronkite "most trusted CIA man in America&a

Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Fri Jul 17, 2009 10:42 pm

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Walter Cronkite, once known as the most trusted man in America, died today age 92. He worked as mouthpiece for a CIA cut-out company called CBS.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8157052.stm

After some WWII reporting and 1950s television work with a chimp, he anchored the CIA-CBS evening news from 1962-1981 and, like Dan Rather and Jim Lehrer, lied about the murder of President Kennedy up to the end and hosted a 1966 special on UFOs when the cover-up was coming badly undone and the veracity of eye-witnesses needed to be discredited.

Walter Cronkite was 'a good soldier' for the US military government during the Cold War just as he had been during WWII.

Due to his avuncular appearance and baritone voice, he was able to deliver state-controlled news in a way that cemented a rapport with a conditioned and misdirected audience that made them grateful for the experience.
In propaganda science this is known as 'parasocial interaction' and is treasured almost more than a false-flag bombing. See 'Tim Russert.'

CBS during the Cold War was practically synonymous with CIA.
The man who hired Cronkite and was his boss, Sig Mickelson, later told of the working relationship that already existed between CBS and CIA when he began there and he continued that relationship. Mickelson even got a hotline phone to CIA. Mickelson later went over to CIA-Voice of America, just like NBC's John Chancellor and a gaggle of NPR people.

May Americans never again trust a news anchor the way they did Walter Cronkite. And he never came clean. A 'good soldier' to his death. And the death of many others.
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Postby justdrew » Fri Jul 17, 2009 11:48 pm

why right now a few days before the big 40 for the moon landing, one of his biggest and most iconic gigs?

anyway, this is one of those that I would just about swear he died in 03 or 04. but what do I know. nothing. that's what.

any any rate the Processus Illustratus Silenti continues...
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Postby Brentos » Fri Jul 17, 2009 11:49 pm

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glasses off please.
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Postby barracuda » Sun Jul 19, 2009 1:38 pm

Walter Cronkite's UFO Encounter

    In the 1950s Cronkite was part of a pool of News Reporters brought out to a small South Pacific island to watch the test of a new Air Force missile. After a short inspection of the new system by the reporters, they were lead to an area that was a safe distance from the launch site. The missile was mounted on a specially-built launcher that was attached to a cement base. It was obvious that the area had been quickly built just for the test. The details about the missile were going to be given to the reporters in he form of hand-out sheets and press releases after the test.

    Cronkite mentioned that he and the other reporters had been warned that photography of the missile test and any audio transmissions or recordings by the press were forbidden. They would have to give a written account of the event. Just as the test was ready to proceed, everyone was writing as fast as they could. As Air Force Security personnel walked around the perimeter of the test area with guard dogs and the news reporters watched, the missile was fired-up and about to be released. Just then, a large disc-type UFO appeared on the scene.

    Cronkite guessed that the object was about 50-60 feet in diameter, a dull grey color and had no visible means of propulsion. Because the noise of activity around him and the missile engine was so loud, he couldn't tell whether the disc made any noise. He did not notice any coming directly from the object.

    As Air Force guards ran toward the UFO with their dogs, the disc hovered about 30 feet off of the ground. It suddenly sent out a blue beam of light which struck the missile, a guard and a dog all at the same time. The missile was frozen in mid-air about 70 feet from the launcher as it had taken off. A guard was frozen in mid-step and a dog frozen in mid-air as it had jumped at the disc. Cronkite reminded me that this all happened within the space of about five minutes or less.

    Suddenly, the missile exploded! After that, the disc vanished. The guard and dog looked alright, but were quickly taken away by medical personnel always present at tests in case anyone became injured. At the same time, guards rapidly ushered the reporters into a concrete observation bunker. After about thirty minutes of sitting in that hot box, they were brought out into the air again and addressed by an Air Force Colonel.

    The officer told them, "It was all part of the test."


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Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Sun Jul 19, 2009 3:59 pm

1992 Village voice article on media killing the truth about JFK's murder-

http://www.ctka.net/policoff.html

Ellen McCloy, daughter of Warren Commission member, John McCloy, worked at CBS and acted as a courier between the network and her father.

CBS rigged an attempted recreation of the shooting, censored LBJ's comments, and browbeat a Dealey Plaza witness out of his account.
Walter Cronkite was complicit.

begin excerpt
>snip<

CBS

CBS decided to go ahead with a documentary series in the fall of 1966, as the cynicism about the assassination continued to mount. Books on the subject were starting to stimulate a national debate. Reports on the suppression of crucial evidence—including the fact the Warren Commission never even saw the actual autopsy photos and X-rays of JFK—had became parlor talk around the country. Buzz phrases like "magic bullet" were being used for the first time to express a growing cynicism. Public opinion polls indicated that a majority of the respondents had begun to doubt that Oswald was the whole story.

The CBS effort was nothing if not monumental. Whereas those who had come before had used fixed targets to test the magic bullet hypothesis, CBS went a giant step further, rigging up a moving target. But the money and manpower thrown at the project was undercut all along the way by errors in procedure and logic; if not motive. For instance, in trying to determine whether Oswald could possibly have fired all the rounds believed to have been squeezed off in Dealey Plaza, CBS used a rifle that was faster than Oswald's: capable of three shots in 4.1 seconds as opposed to 4.6 seconds for Oswald's. The 11 CBS marksmen fired 37 firing runs of three shots each; of those, an amazing 17 of the 37 runs were disqualified as Cronkite said "because of trouble with the rifle." And, even with their faster guns and time to practice, the 11 marksmen averaged 5.6 seconds to get off their three shots, with an average of 1.2 hits. Oswald, a notoriously bad shot firing with a slower gun, is alleged to have done much better—three shots and two direct hits in 5.6 seconds, with no warm-up. CBS neglected to inform its viewers of the poor total average hit ratio. How did CBS interpret these rifle tests? "It seems reasonable to say that an expert could fire that rifle in five seconds," intoned Walter Cronkite. "It seems equally reasonable to say that Oswald, under normal circumstances, would take longer. But these were not normal circumstances. Oswald was shooting at a president. So our answer is: probably fast enough."

Such lapses may well be explained by a perusal of internal CBS documents, generated in preparation for the 1967 documentary, that have been obtained by the Voice. The documents show the highly unusual role played by one Ellen McCloy, who for years had served as the administrative assistant to Richard Salant, head of CBS News. During the production of the CBS series, McCloy was one of only a handful of people who was cc'd on all 10 memos obtained by the Voice concerning the work in progress. (McCloy and Salant contend there was nothing unusual in this arrangement as she routinely received copies of Salant's correspondence.) But in this instance, she was more than a passive recipient, filing duplicates for her boss. She was passing along not her own opinions but those of "Dad."

Ellen McCloy's father, John J. McCloy, had not only served on the Warren Commission but had been Assistant Secretary of War, High Commissioner for West Germany, chair of the World Bank, chair of Chase Manhattan Bank, and head of the Ford Foundation. According to Kai Bird, author of the soon to be released biography The Chairman: John Jay McCloy—the Making of the American Establishment, McCloy was "the guy who greased the wheels between the world of Wall Street, big foundations, and Washington." McCloy himself acknowledged his agenda: showing that America was not "a banana republic, where a government can be changed by conspiracy."

Not only did McCloy appear in CBS's documentary, he also lurked about in the shadows, helping to steer and shape. A handwritten note on CBS stationery from Ellen McCloy to Les Midgley, producer of the series, gives the reader a feel for the close relationships between the McCloys and the CBS bunch.
The memo reads: "One comment that Dad [emphasis added] made after reading the `rough script' Mr. Salant wanted me to pass on toyou. It concerned a sentence (—or two—) that appears on the top of page 5C. ... Dad said: 1) he had no recollection of the President (LBJ) asking or urging the members of the Warren Commission to act `with speed.' 2) The phrase `In less than a year' again implies that the commission might have acted in haste. Dad suggests that you might say `after 8 1/2 months ... ' —Ellen" Or again: "Dad asked me to give you the enclosed. He said it shouldn't be considered a bribe ... maybe it's just a gift as the result of the birth of Luci's baby. `The old man' thanks you very much for the booklet!!! —Ellen"

On July 20, 1967, Midgley sent a letter to John McCloy thanking him for his "extremely kind and generous comments," adding, "Another member of your family also sweated this all out with us and did a fine job." Salant now contends that Ellen McCloy's presence on the CBS payroll did not prejudice the documentaries. "Should who her father was have disqualified her from the job?" he asks. "She was a very able lady. She worked for me for six years." Ellen McCloy concurs that she herself did nothing to influence the editorial content of the documentaries. "I would act as a conduit," McCloy explained. "I would take things home and they would ask me to ask my dad this or that." He and producer Midgley remain proud of the series, and believe it holds up. "It still is the major journalistic inquiry into this 25 years later ... it was an independent inquiry."

But the McCloy memos, and a few others, certainly raise a question about how open-minded and thoroughgoing CBS was. Take, for instance, this April 26, 1967, memo from Salant to Midgley: "Is the question of whether Oswald was a CIA or FBI informant really so substantial that we have to deal with it?" The answer was, maybe. In CBS's June 28, 1967, program, Cronkite does indeed refer to Oswald's FBI connection in the following fashion: "The question of whether Oswald had any relationship with the FBI or the CIA is not frivolous. The agencies, of course, are silent. Although the Warren Commission had full power to conduct its own independent investigation, it permitted the FBI and the CIA to investigate themselves—and so cast a permanent shadow on the answers."

Although Salant asserts to this day that CBS was only after the truth, a recently released documentary indicates otherwise. Danny Schechter's Beyond JFK: The Question of Conspiracy, features Walter Cronkite conceding that CBS News in 1970 censored Lyndon Johnson's own doubts about the lone-assassin theory. Cronkite tells Schechter that Johnson invoked "national security" to get CBS to edit out his remarks long after they had been captured on film. Cronkite and CBS, of course, reflexively complied.

But perhaps nothing revealed CBS's prejudice in the series more tellingly than the network's treatment of Orville Nix, a man who was wielding a movie camera across from the grassy knoll on that fateful day. Nix, who had worked for the General Service Administration as an air conditioning repairman in the Dallas Secret Service building, sold his footage to UPI for $5000 in 1963. But, according to his granddaughter Gayle Nix Jackson, the film only brought him heartache.

"The FBI had issued a dictum to all of Dallas's film labs that any assassination photos had to be turned over to the FBI immediately," recalls Gayle Jackson. "The lab called my granddad first and, like the good American he was, he rushed it to the FBI." Nix had to turn his camera over to the FBI as well. "They took the camera for five months. They said they needed to analyze it. They returned it in pieces," recalls Jackson. In 1967 Nix dutifully turned out for the CBS re-creation. Recalls his granddaughter: "His turn came to reenact what he saw. They said, `Mr. Nix, where did the shots come from?' He said, `From over there on that grassy knoll behind the picket fence.' Then it would be, `Cut!' We went through this six or seven times and each time it was, `Cut!' And then a producer stepped forward and said, `Orville, where did the Warren Commission say the shots came from?' My granddad said, `Well, the Texas Book Depository.' The producer said, `That's what you need to say.'" CBS producer Bernard Birnbaum, who worked on the documentary, denies the exchange. "We never tried to put any words in anybody's mouth, absolutely not," he told the Voice. Birnbaum says CBS did give Warren Commission critics air time and cites a segment of the documentary where another eyewitness contends shots came from the grassy knoll. "We were looking to disprove everything," he insists.

According to Jackson, her grandfather also told CBS that there were four shots fired during the assassination, an observation subsequently endorsed by the House Select Committee on Assassinations in 1975, based on controversial acoustical evidence. But what did the CBS viewing audience hear from Nix? "Bang, bang, bang," as if to suggest that Nix also subscribed to the three-bang theory.

After being browbeaten by CBS, Orville Nix, a normally mild-mannered man, became furious. "He was hitting the steering wheel on the ride back home saying, `Why are they trying to make me feel like I am insane?'" Jackson recalls. She remembers that a year or so later, when District Attorney Jim Garrison called for Nix to testify, her grandfather wouldn't talk. He was afraid for his life.


How many other witnesses experienced the Orville Nix you-never-heard/saw-that phenomenon we will never know. But one other was Kenny O'Donnell, a confidant and adviser to JFK who was in the motorcade. In Tip O'Neill's book Man of The House, O'Neill describes a conversation with O'Donnell, who told him he was sure that two shots had come from the fence behind the grassy knoll. O'Neill said to O'Donnell, "That's not what you told the Warren Commission." O'Donnell responded, "You're right, I told the FBI what I had heard, but they said it couldn't have happened that way and that I must have been imagining things. So I testified the way they wanted me to. I just didn't want to stir up any more pain and trouble for the family."

Since Orville Nix's death in 1988, his granddaughter, a former loss-prevention executive, has been waging a one-woman war to get the original film back from UPI. She wants it analyzed to reveal the details that a copy does not provide. "You know my granddad believed in the Texas handshake, and that is how he made his deal with UPI." According to Jackson, the rights to the film were to revert to Nix's estate in 1988. After initially getting a green light from UPI for the return of the film, the then-media giant informed her that the attorney that granted her request was "no longer with the company." She was told to wait until 1991. Then on June 4, 1991, came a note from UPI's general counsel, Frank Kane. "UPI agrees that, in accordance with the oral agreement ... UPI hereby releases all rights over the Nix Film to Mr. Nix's heirs and assigns." There was only one problem. UPI no longer had the film. Jackson received a letter saying the film had gone to the Warren Commission and was supposedly housed in the National Archives. With the Warren Commission out of business, she contacted the National Archives only to learn that the original was not there either.

The last official place the film was said to have been was in the House Select Committee on Assassinations files. That Committee was convened in 1975 to investigate the assassinations of John Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, and Martin Luther King. The chief counsel for the HSCA, G. Robert Blakey, who has a penchant for gagging his staff via mandatory secrecy oaths, came clean with Nix's granddaughter about the fate of the family heirloom, says Jackson. "Blakey's the only one who takes full responsibility for the loss of the film because it was his committee that was supposed to assure that all evidence was returned to the rightful owner," Jackson says. So much for posterity's view of the grassy knoll on November 22, 1963. A former HSCA staff member, Gaeton Fonzi, recalls that back at the time of the hearings the staff "heard rumors that Blakey planned to classify all of the committee files, but we didn't believe them because that would be too reminiscent of what the Warren Commission had done." In fact many of the files were classified and this same man, Blakey, is the one who has been recently assigned to help draft legislation about what will be released from the original Kennedy assassination files.

>snip<
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Postby DoYouEverWonder » Sun Jul 19, 2009 7:03 pm

Funny how all these very important original videos just disappear, but they can still find master copies of of the original Mickey Mouse.
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Postby compared2what? » Sun Jul 19, 2009 9:38 pm

You know what? A man's a man for a' that. None of is innocent and most -- including most of the literally guilty -- aren't such unmitigated criminals that it mightn't in its own way be a pretty serious wrong in itself to so wholly lose sight of their humanity on the occasions of their decease that you can't be bothered to spend a few moments acknowledging that they were, as we all are, human and therefore fully subject to the limitations of that condition.

I mean, if the lives and personalities of Robert McNamara and Michael Jackson are held to have included enough that was good, or sympathetic, or of potentially positive value to the world they left behind to be worth remembering, I don't see how or why or according to what orthodoxy Walter Cronkite doesn't genuinely deserve the same consideration.

Whether or not his credibility and prestige were honestly earned or not, he had absolutely no guarantee that he wasn't throwing them away when he did this broadcast, for example. Furthermore, although he was speaking from a position of unquestioned belief in some political premises that many at RI reject, he was virtually alone among eminent members of the MSM in that he damn well went on television on September 20, 2001, for crying out loud, and unequivocally spoke out against the invasion of Afghanistan, on the grounds that it was a jingoistic, unjustified and brutal act of bloodthirsty vengeance. While fairly plainly implying that the President's address to congress on the same date was going to be based on bullshit, to boot.

Still further, unlike McNamara, when Cronkite was asked whether his conclusions about Vietnam (which unlike McNamara, he was able to reach in fewer than a couple of decades) he not only didn't prevaricate, he actively used as much of his once influential and still formidable talent for pointing popular attention in the direction of issues in genuine want of it that he had left to do exactly that, back in 2006:

    Engaged in a question and answer session at the critics' meeting, Mr Cronkite said he considered what he said on Vietnam as his proudest achievement. When a reporter asked him whether, given the chance, he would offer similar advice on Iraq, he did not even wait until the end of the question. "Yes," he said flatly. "It's my belief that we should get out now."

    Mr Cronkite added that the best time to have opted for withdrawal would have been directly after Hurricane Katrina struck America's Gulf coast, crushing communities and inundating New Orleans.

    "We had an opportunity to say to the world and Iraqis after the hurricane disaster that Mother Nature has not treated us well and we find ourselves missing the amount of money it takes to help these poor people out of their homeless situation and rebuild some of our most important cities in the United States," he said. "Therefore, we are going to have to bring our troops home."

    He added that the Iraqi people should have been told that "our hearts are with you" and that the United States would continue to do all it could to help rebuild the country. But he went on: "I think we could have been able to retire with honour. In fact, I think we can retire with honour anyway."


He also consistently called the war on drugs the disaster that it is, to name just one of the numerous other positions he took apparently as a matter of honest conviction, based on the best of his ability to understand the issues within the limitations of the only perspective his individual life and circumstances afforded him.

For those reasons, and despite his failure single-handedly and heroically to rise high enough above the constraints of his time, culture and perceived obligation to the public when still struggling to accommodate the apparent impossibility of reconciling events with the foundations on which his professional and personal integrity had been built in the short-term aftermath of a crisis of previously inconceivable extremity after the assassination of President Kennedy, I say:

RIP.

Which doesn't mean I regard him as a hero without flaw, or as a man who never ever compromised his beliefs for the sake of his own personal comfort. And/or expediency. And/or his naturally occurring predisposition to accord more weight to information that was compatible with the worldview to which he was already committed than to information that contradicted it. The last of which is a quality we all share to some extent if we're human, and with which we all struggle if we're honest with ourselves.

In fact, on that score, if on no other, I'd say he did better than most humans do, myself not excluded. And I think that's worth honoring, at least in passing. So I'm honoring it. By choice. It's not like I think it's an obligation that extends to anyone else, nor am I so arguing. So please carry on, as you were.

---------------

*Which I'm guessing may have been the earliest opportunity he had to do it very publicly and with any hope of being heeded, although I don't really know. It just strikes me as highly likely that if he opposed Afghanistan in 2001, he probably had some doubts about Iraq prior to 2006.
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Re: Died-Walter Cronkite "most trusted CIA man in Ameri

Postby elephant » Sun Jul 19, 2009 11:00 pm

Hugh Manatee Wins wrote:
May Americans never again trust a news anchor the way they did Walter Cronkite. And he never came clean. A 'good soldier' to his death. And the death of many others.


What self-righteous blather. The man's body is still warm, but you slam him for some secret but massive complicity with evil without the slightest interest in supplying evidence.

Then two days later, perhaps thinking you should offer something to support your demonizing characterization, you find a 1992 article on the media's treatment of JFK's assassination that includes a couple of references to Cronkite.

Proof positive! You've done it again, Hugh! Exposing the evils in our midst through a most rigorous intuition!
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Postby 2012 Countdown » Sun Jul 19, 2009 11:06 pm

compared2what? wrote: he was virtually alone among eminent members of the MSM in that he damn well went on television on September 20, 2001, for crying out loud, and unequivocally spoke out against the invasion of Afghanistan, on the grounds that it was a jingoistic, unjustified and brutal act of bloodthirsty vengeance. While fairly plainly implying that the President's address to congress on the same date was going to be based on bullshit, to boot.


*Which I'm guessing may have been the earliest opportunity he had to do it very publicly and with any hope of being heeded, although I don't really know. It just strikes me as highly likely that if he opposed Afghanistan in 2001, he probably had some doubts about Iraq prior to 2006.



That clip of him and what he says is very important to any judgements that will be made. Fantastic clip.
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Re: Died-Walter Cronkite "most trusted CIA man in Ameri

Postby lightningBugout » Sun Jul 19, 2009 11:46 pm

elephant wrote:
Hugh Manatee Wins wrote:
May Americans never again trust a news anchor the way they did Walter Cronkite. And he never came clean. A 'good soldier' to his death. And the death of many others.


What self-righteous blather. The man's body is still warm, but you slam him for some secret but massive complicity with evil without the slightest interest in supplying evidence.

Then two days later, perhaps thinking you should offer something to support your demonizing characterization, you find a 1992 article on the media's treatment of JFK's assassination that includes a couple of references to Cronkite.

Proof positive! You've done it again, Hugh! Exposing the evils in our midst through a most rigorous intuition!


puh-leaze.
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Postby barracuda » Mon Jul 20, 2009 1:06 am

compared2what?, I could say I wish I'd said that, but that wouldn't be quite what I'd mean. Nicely done. A life is rarely so single-mindedly lived that you can't give a man his due when all is done.
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Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Mon Jul 20, 2009 1:38 am

I wasn't demonizing him. Just pointing out stark facts.
No cult of personality shushing, please.

I know all about the post-anchorman Walter Cronkite and expected the "but he" exonerating add-on posts to my initial stark characterization.
Gosh, he even approved of Project Censored! And?

No, he almost certainly didn't want fascism.
c2w is right, of course. He was a product of his times, just like McNamara.

Just like us. Only we aren't in the old boyz club of mind-benders who think they are on Olympus and mustn't wake the wee ones with dark truths.

He sold American militarism as 'the good war,' World War Two, yet again recently on CIA-PBS along with Ken Burns. 100% recruiting psyops. Even during this Vietnam as if he didn't remember the last one.

It was sad to see his earlier glorious life experiences exploited for the current full-blown fascist US government, precisely what World War Two was allegedly supposed to prevent.
Granpa Walter on the Goebbels Channel pushing 'Education for Death.'

Did you see the New York Times front page story lay-out on Cronkite?
They put his photo right on the fold to emphasize that he was 'head-and-shoulders-above.' That's what was showing above the fold.
Cute framing trick.

And every little emotional cred prop helps because CIA media is on the ropes. They know we don't trust them and that some of us have even figured out how FM33-1 is used to run mainstream media as psyops, just a big C3 network between a military government and the masses.

So they desperately need the parasocial interaction with a Nice Guy at a Desk to cover for their global atrocity system. Likeable = trusted.
And this is dangerous for an uneducated misinformed heuristic public.

That's why I intentionally pointed out as starkly as possible the enormous chasm between how he was perceived by the masses -
Pillor of Journalistic Integrity
- and what he actually did as an anchorman-Read state-controlled fascist propaganda.

He never talked about the CIA and the media, did he?
Even his boss, Sig Mickelson, did. So why did Walter hold out on us?

Like Bill Moyers, his omissions are notable and he sustained a fascist status quo, not the opposite. For our own good, I'm sure.
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Postby monster » Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:28 am

Hugh - so you're glad he's dead?
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Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:44 am

barracuda wrote:compared2what?, I could say I wish I'd said that, but that wouldn't be quite what I'd mean. Nicely done. A life is rarely so single-mindedly lived that you can't give a man his due when all is done.

Oh, I agree. I fully expected c2w's subtle but fair human assessment having just processed McNamara.

That's precisely why I made the point I did the way I did.
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Postby Hugh Manatee Wins » Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:45 am

monster wrote:Hugh - so you're glad he's dead?

Of course not. But thanks for your brevity.

I''m pointing out what can be learned from Cronkite's life.
I think he'd approve even though he wouldn't say it himself.

Interesting that some react as if I was attacking him as evil.
Have I told untruths about the context of Cronkite's work? No.

Does my pointing out that he was a CIA mouthpiece and never admitted it even when his boss did make people uncomfortable and go protective the way many did when Reagan was criticized? Seems so. Not that they're equivalent, just the subjective/objective schism.

People like Bill Moyers and are unwilling to admit his past and his omissions.
This "liking" thing is very very dangerous in a psyops culture that specializes in preying on complacency and misplaced trust.

Likeable people do things that assist a terrible system due to their own justifications or blind spots.

That's my point. That Cronkite was likeable and well-intentioned.
And this obscures the significance of the effect of his actions, some of them witting, which helped fascism.
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