Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

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Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby seemslikeadream » Wed Mar 13, 2013 3:07 pm

We have a Pope

His name is Francis l ..he is a Jesuit from Argentina

Head of the Jesuits

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio Of Buenos Aires

advocate for the poor

Image

CARDINAL JORGE MARIO BERGOGLIO: Bergoglio, 76, has spent nearly his entire career at home in Argentina, overseeing churches and shoe-leather priests. The archbishop of Buenos Aires reportedly got the second-most votes after Joseph Ratzinger in the 2005 papal election, and he has long specialized in the kind of pastoral work that some say is an essential skill for the next pope.

In a lifetime of teaching and leading priests in Latin America, which has the largest share of the world's Catholics, Bergoglio has shown a keen political sensibility as well as the kind of self-effacing humility that fellow cardinals value highly. Bergoglio is known for modernizing an Argentine church that had been among the most conservative in Latin America.


First time in 2000 years.... He is the first pope ever of the Americas.
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby American Dream » Wed Mar 13, 2013 7:52 pm

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree ... repentance

The sins of the Argentinian church
The Catholic church was complicit in dreadful crimes in Argentina.
Now it has a chance to repen
t


Hugh O'Shaughnessy
guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 4 January 2011


Image
Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, the archbishop of Buenos Aires.

Benedict XVI gave us words of great comfort and encouragement in the message he delivered on Christmas Eve.

"God anticipates us again and again in unexpected ways," the pope said. "He does not cease to search for us, to raise us up as often as we might need. He does not abandon the lost sheep in the wilderness into which it had strayed. God does not allow himself to be confounded by our sin. Again and again he begins afresh with us".

If these words comforted and encouraged me they will surely have done the same for leaders of the church in Argentina, among many others. To the judicious and fair-minded outsider it has been clear for years that the upper reaches of the Argentinian church contained many "lost sheep in the wilderness", men who had communed and supported the unspeakably brutal western-supported military dictatorship that seized power in that country in 1976 and battened on it for years. Not only did the generals slaughter thousands unjustly, often dropping them out of aeroplanes over the River Plate and selling off their orphan children to the highest bidder, they also murdered at least two bishops and many priests. Yet even the execution of other men of the cloth did nothing to shake the support of senior clerics, including representatives of the Holy See, for the criminality of their leader General Jorge Rafael Videla and his minions.

As it happens, in the week before Christmas in the city of Córdoba Videla and some of his military and police cohorts were convicted by their country's courts of the murder of 31 people between April and October 1976, a small fraction of the killings they were responsible for. The convictions brought life sentences for some of the military. These were not to be served, as has often been the case in Argentina and neighbouring Chile, in comfy armed forces retirement homes but in common prisons. Unsurprisingly there was dancing in the city's streets when the judge announced the sentences.

What one did not hear from any senior member of the Argentinian hierarchy was any expression of regret for the church's collaboration and in these crimes. The extent of the church's complicity in the dark deeds was excellently set out by Horacio Verbitsky, one of Argentina's most notable journalists, in his book El Silencio (Silence). He recounts how the Argentinian navy with the connivance of Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, now the Jesuit archbishop of Buenos Aires, hid from a visiting delegation of the Inter-American Human Rights Commission the dictatorship's political prisoners. Bergoglio was hiding them in nothing less than his holiday home in an island called El Silencio in the River Plate. The most shaming thing for the church is that in such circumstances Bergoglio's name was allowed to go forward in the ballot to chose the successor of John Paul II. What scandal would not have ensued if the first pope ever to be elected from the continent of America had been revealed as an accessory to murder and false imprisonment

One would have thought that the Argentinian bishops would have seized the opportunity to call for pardon for themselves and put on sackcloth and ashes as the sentences were announced in Córdoba but that has not so far happened.

But happily Their Eminences have just been given another chance to express contrition. Next month the convicted murderer Videla will be arraigned for his part in the killing of Enrique Angelelli, bishop of the Andean diocese of La Rioja and a supporter of the cause of poorer Argentinians. He was run off the highway by a hit squad of the Videla régime and killed on 4th August 1976 shortly after Videla's putsch.

Cardinal Bergoglio has plenty of time to be measured for a suit of sackcloth – perhaps tailored in a suitable clerical grey – to be worn when the church authorities are called into the witness box by the investigating judge in the Angelelli case. Ashes will be readily available if the records of the Argentinian bishops' many disingenuous and outrightly mendacious statements about Videla and Angelelli are burned.
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby General Patton » Wed Mar 13, 2013 8:32 pm

He isn't associated directly with the financial or sexual abuse scandals. And he gets to help the church reclaim market share in Latin America and expand across Africa. Definitely good for the brand.
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for Albino Luciani

Postby IanEye » Wed Mar 13, 2013 8:34 pm

*



Oh go through the walls; if you must, walk on the ledges
Of roofs, of oceans; cover yourself with light;
Use menace, use prayer…


My sleepers will flee toward another America


*
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby 8bitagent » Wed Mar 13, 2013 8:40 pm

footage has emerged on the secret palpacy process...

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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby justdrew » Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:02 pm

They've once again missed an opportunity

After Pope John Paul

I've always said we needed

Pope George Ringo
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby NaturalMystik » Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:18 pm

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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby seemslikeadream » Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:29 pm

Jesuits to Elect a New 'Black Pope'

By Jeff Israely/Rome Friday, Jan. 04, 2008

The head of the Jesuits, known as the Black Pope, Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, pictured here with Pope Benedict XVI, will be replaced for the first time in 25 years.

All the incense and intrigue of another papal conclave is upon us again. Well, sort of. Pope Benedict XVI is alive and well and attending to his mission as absolute ruler of the Roman Catholic Church for the foreseeable future. But just down the block from St. Peter's Square, church elders — though not all so old, and without a Cardinal among them — have begun gathering for a closed-door meeting to elect the man dubbed the "black pope." That's the moniker historically assigned to the leader of the Jesuit order: for the color of the simple priestly vestments he keeps on wearing, for his lifetime posting, and for the planetary influence he carries.

The Jesuits' outgoing Superior General is a soft-spoken Netherlands native named Father Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, who has served since 1983. The 79-year-old last year became the first ever Jesuit leader to ask for, and receive, papal permission to retire from the post. White-haired and goateed, Kolvenbach has kept a low public profile during his quarter-century reign, but is widely praised for his skills in reestablishing good ties with the Holy See after the run-ins with top Vatican officials of his predecessor, a charismatic Basque-born progressive named Pedro Arrupe.

Though more recently established, more traditionalist movements and religious orders such as Opus Dei and the Legionaries of Christ have gotten more attention of late, the Jesuits are still far and away the largest clerical order in the Church. They too, however, have suffered from declining ordinations, down to fewer than 20,000 members from a peak of 36,000 in the 1960s. The election for the latest successor of St. Ignatius, the 16th century founder of the Jesuits, will take place in the days following next Monday's opening of the 35th General Congregation, a meeting of 226 delegates elected from the orders geographical "provinces" around the world. Though there is no set date for the election, which requires a three-fourths majority of delegates, Jesuit sources say by mid-January there should be a new Superior General.

Though without the absolute lockdown secrecy of the papal conclave — or the accompanying media speculation — the Superior General's election has its own traditions. And intrigue. The voting begins only after four days of what in Latin is called "murmuratio" or private discussions among the delegates about necessary requisites and possible candidates for the job. Anyone showing any sign of ambition is automatically disqualified. Then, after a prayer to the Holy Spirit and oath of allegiance, the voting is carried out with secret written ballots.

Like the Cardinal electors in a papal conclave, the Jesuit delegates will be considering candidates' prayerfulness, leadership and organizational capacity, language skills and geography. Some wonder if the Jesuits may elect their first ever leader from Asia, with Father Lisbert D'Sousa of India mentioned. Australian Father Mark Raper, former head of the Jesuit Refugee Service, is also among those on insiders' lists, as is Italian Father Federico Lombardi, the current papal spokesman and longtime head of Vatican radio and television channels.

New Jersey-born, Rome-based Jesuit, Father Keith Pecklers, says the ideal successor "will be a combination of the two" most recent superior generals. "We need someone with Arrupe's prophetic vision and courage but also it's absolutely key the leader will be someone with the diplomatic skills Kolvenbach has to maintain close ties with Holy See."

Indeed, the order was founded with a special mission to directly serve the Pontiff, and has been dubbed the "Pope's cavalry," engendering suspicion in the past of conspiracies and secret powers. Even Popes, including John Paul II, have criticized them for their apparent autonomy. "Yes, we are in the vanguard of the Church," says Jose de Vera, head spokesman for the order. "It is not our job to just repeat the catechism, but to do research. Sometimes looking for real truth, you can step over the line." Just last year, the Vatican's doctrinal office issued a "Notification" to Spanish Jesuit scholar Jon Sobrino, a proponent of Marxist-inspired liberation theology, for what they called "erroneous ... and even dangerous" writings.

Most Jesuits steer clear of offending the Vatican hierarchy, focusing on frontline missionary work amongst the poor and oppressed. Noted in particular for their vast network of schools and universities, the Jesuits are widely considered the day-to-day educational and intellectual motor for Roman Catholicism. Pecklers, who teaches liturgy at the Gregorian University in Rome, has lately been working on an education project in the hinterlands of Mongolia. "Whereas a Benedictine is centered around his monastery, the Jesuit's life is the road. The way we've achieved our credibility is getting our hands dirty, getting involved in issues of countries." Still, the order is facing many of the same challenges that face the entire Church, including declining numbers of clergy, especially in Western Europe and North America, and the tricky balancing act between faith and politics.

Since the Second Vatican Council, many Jesuits have favored progressive reform in the Church, seeking to adapt Catholic traditions to modern life. Kolvenbach's request to Benedict to step down as he approached the age of 80, Vatican sources say, could have implications for the "white" papacy as well if a Pope were to consider retiring because of old age or ill health.

For now, though, there's just one "papal" transition to worry about. The delegates will do their voting inside the Jesuits' vast, marble-lined headquarters on Borgo Santo Spirito. Doors closed, no outsiders allowed in. When one man has received the necessary majority, rather than white smoke, we'll know there is a new "black pope" by the sound of applause through the wooden doors of the Jesuit sala. As for revealing the new Superior General's identity to the world: before the delegates are allowed to leave the voting hall, a lone messenger will take the short walk over to St. Peter's Square to be sure that, by tradition, the first person to know the name of the new Jesuit leader is the one and only real Pope.


Bergoglio's service as the top Jesuit leader of Argentina beginning in 1973,
Last edited by seemslikeadream on Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby FourthBase » Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:32 pm

NaturalMystik wrote:Image


I'll take Buddy Christ and Cardinal Carlin any day, every day, over the current monstrosity.

The contrast between coordinated media ball-washing and reality could not have been made any clearer than today, as the proprietor of El Silencio became the cuddly, poor-adoring Pope abominably named after probably the second-greatest Christian altruist of all-time.
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:36 am

‘Dirty War’ Questions for Pope Francis
March 13, 2013
Exclusive: The U.S. “news” networks bubbled with excitement over the selection of Argentine Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio to be Pope Francis I. But there was silence on the obvious question that should be asked about any senior cleric from Argentina: What was Bergoglio doing during the “dirty war,” writes Robert Parry.


By Robert Parry

If one wonders if the U.S. press corps has learned anything in the decade since the Iraq War – i.e. the need to ask tough question and show honest skepticism – it would appear from the early coverage of the election of Pope Francis I that U.S. journalists haven’t changed at all, even at “liberal” outlets like MSNBC.

The first question that a real reporter should ask about an Argentine cleric who lived through the years of grotesque repression, known as the “dirty war,” is what did this person do, did he stand up to the murderers and torturers or did he go with the flow. If the likes of Chris Matthews and other commentators on MSNBC had done a simple Google search, they would have found out enough about Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio to slow their bubbling enthusiasm.

Bergoglio, now the new Pope Francis I, has been identified publicly as an ally of Argentine’s repressive leaders during the “dirty war” when some 30,000 people were “disappeared” or killed, many stripped naked, chained together, flown out over the River Plate or the Atlantic Ocean and pushed sausage-like out of planes to drown.

The “disappeared” included women who were pregnant at the time of their arrest. In some bizarre nod to Catholic theology, they were kept alive only long enough to give birth before they were murdered and their babies were farmed out to military families, including to people directly involved in the murder of the babies’ mothers.

Instead of happy talk about how Bergoglio seems so humble and how he seems so sympathetic to the poor, there might have been a question or two about what he did to stop the brutal repression of poor people and activists who represented the interests of the poor, including “liberation theology” priests and nuns, during the “dirty war.”

Here, for instance, is an easily retrievable story from Guardian columnist Hugh O’Shauhnessy from 2011, which states:

“To the judicious and fair-minded outsider it has been clear for years that the upper reaches of the Argentine church contained many ‘lost sheep in the wilderness’, men who had communed and supported the unspeakably brutal Western-supported military dictatorship which seized power in that country in 1976 and battened on it for years.

“Not only did the generals slaughter thousands unjustly, often dropping them out of aeroplanes over the River Plate and selling off their orphan children to the highest bidder, they also murdered at least two bishops and many priests. Yet even the execution of other men of the cloth did nothing to shake the support of senior clerics, including representatives of the Holy See, for the criminality of their leader General Jorge Rafael Videla and his minions.

“As it happens, in the week before Christmas [2010] in the city of Córdoba Videla and some of his military and police cohorts were convicted by their country’s courts of the murder of 31 people between April and October 1976, a small fraction of the killings they were responsible for. The convictions brought life sentences for some of the military.

“These were not to be served, as has often been the case in Argentina and neighbouring Chile, in comfy armed forces retirement homes but in common prisons. Unsurprisingly there was dancing in the city’s streets when the judge announced the sentences.

“What one did not hear from any senior member of the Argentine hierarchy was any expression of regret for the church’s collaboration and in these crimes. The extent of the church’s complicity in the dark deeds was excellently set out by Horacio Verbitsky, one of Argentina’s most notable journalists, in his book El Silencio (Silence).

“He recounts how the Argentine navy with the connivance of Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio, now the Jesuit archbishop of Buenos Aires, hid from a visiting delegation of the Inter-American Human Rights Commission the dictatorship’s political prisoners. Bergoglio was hiding them in nothing less than his holiday home in an island called El Silencio in the River Plate.

“The most shaming thing for the church is that in such circumstances Bergoglio’s name was allowed to go forward in the ballot to chose the successor of John Paul II. What scandal would not have ensued if the first pope ever to be elected from the continent of America had been revealed as an accessory to murder and false imprisonment.

“One would have thought that the Argentine bishops would have seized the opportunity to call for pardon for themselves and put on sackcloth and ashes as the sentences were announced in Córdoba but that has not so far happened.

“But happily Their Eminences have just been given another chance to express contrition. Next month the convicted murderer Videla will be arraigned for his part in the killing of Enrique Angelelli, bishop of the Andean diocese of La Rioja and a supporter of the cause of poorer Argentines. He was run off the highway by a hit squad of the Videla régime and killed on 4th August 1976 shortly after Videla’s putsch. …

“Cardinal Bergoglio has plenty of time to be measured for a suit of sackcloth – perhaps tailored in a suitable clerical grey – to be worn when the church authorities are called into the witness box by the investigating judge in the Angelelli case. Ashes will be readily available if the records of the Argentine bishops’ many disingenuous and outrightly mendacious statements about Videla and Angelelli are burned.”

Now, instead of just putting forward Bergoglio’s name as a candidate for Pope, the College of Cardinals has actually elected him. Perhaps the happy-talking correspondents from the U.S. news media will see no choice but to join in the cover-up of what Pope Francis did during the “dirty war.” Otherwise, they might offend some people in power and put their careers in jeopardy.


A New Pope and "The Most Corrupt Vatican Since the Borgias"
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby Nordic » Thu Mar 14, 2013 3:03 am

There really needs to be some sort of class action lawsuit in America against our so-called "news" outlets. Call it malpractice, or fraud, false advertising, or whatever, it would be nice to publicly go after them for their bullshit.
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Mar 14, 2013 7:31 am

Image

The Pentecostals clearly have fervor. Their evangelical, charismatic spirit is dynamic, loud and vibrant. In São Paulo, a Pentecostal church is building a $200 million, 10,000-seat megachurch that replicates Solomon’s temple, with rocks imported from Israel so locals will feel closer to the Holy Land. Even self-acclaimed Catholics across the entire region are identifying not just as Catholic but also as born-again. Latino converts overwhelmingly say they want to know God personally, and they want to do so in their own cultural context.
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby FourthBase » Thu Mar 14, 2013 9:33 am

"New World Pope", oh boy.

The magazine cover title that launched 1000 theories.
(Not all of them bullshit, per se.)
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby JackRiddler » Thu Mar 14, 2013 10:08 am

Slugger 4B, here's my theory, and I got it from you: The Empire and the Vatican both want badly to beat up the Commies in Latin America and just fuck all those countries back to hell, and they're looking to recapture the magic of the Reagan-John Paul combo's propaganda war on the Soviets (as to the effectiveness of the latter, it was there, but the idea that they brought down the Warsaw Pact is false triumphalism).

This guy is plenty dirty from the Dirty War. With Ratzinger, an adolescence in Hitler youth can be played into Just a Product of His Time, but Bergoglio was already a high church official when he went to bat for Argentina's torture generals. DN had a big piece on this this morning, I'll post a link later.
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Re: Habemus Papam! Pope Francis l

Postby FourthBase » Thu Mar 14, 2013 1:09 pm

JackRiddler wrote:Slugger 4B, here's my theory, and I got it from you: The Empire and the Vatican both want badly to beat up the Commies in Latin America and just fuck all those countries back to hell, and they're looking to recapture the magic of the Reagan-John Paul combo's propaganda war on the Soviets (as to the effectiveness of the latter, it was there, but the idea that they brought down the Warsaw Pact is false triumphalism).

This guy is plenty dirty from the Dirty War. With Ratzinger, an adolescence in Hitler youth can be played into Just a Product of His Time, but Bergoglio was already a high church official when he went to bat for Argentina's torture generals. DN had a big piece on this this morning, I'll post a link later.


Yep. That was the rigorous essence in my intuition that day, March 5th.
Although I was not nearly as conscious of the situation as you explain it here.
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