[Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Moderators: DrVolin, 82_28, Elvis, Jeff

Would you like a GD Data Dump for media examples of the term "CT"?

Poll ended at Sun Nov 03, 2013 11:11 am

Yes
11
65%
No
6
35%
 
Total votes : 17

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby Harvey » Tue Jan 05, 2016 5:21 am

When looking for an explanation closer to home, he's still bitter about being outshone by former comedy partner Robert Newman?

And while we spoke of many things, fools and kings
This he said to me
"The greatest thing
You'll ever learn
Is just to love
And be loved
In return"


Eden Ahbez
User avatar
Harvey
 
Posts: 1637
Joined: Mon May 09, 2011 4:49 am
Blog: View Blog (20)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby stefano » Fri Aug 26, 2016 5:43 am

From the Economist, weathervane of Western elite opinion:

It is hard to dissuade people from believing conspiracy theories, especially when there really has been a conspiracy.


Ha.
User avatar
stefano
 
Posts: 2672
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:50 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby stefano » Wed Jan 25, 2017 7:41 am

Oh HuffPo!

Trump Spokesman Confirms Trump Is A Conspiracy Theorist

Sam Stein
24/01/2017 22:33 SAST

White House press secretary Sean Spicer confirmed on Tuesday that his boss, the president of the United States, is a committed conspiracy theorist.


So, "conspiracy theory" in headline and lede, followed by reinforcing messages signalling that believing conspiracy theories means believing bullshit:

There is no evidence ... multiple outlets and fact checkers have called such allegations bunk … repeatedly... baseless claims...organizations credulously promoted the false claim.... demonstrable lies...Lie About Popular Vote...claim lacked merit...a claim that has no basis in fact.


Thought this was a pearl, too: "the campaign ended with Trump losing the popular vote by nearly 3 million voters." That's not the important bit though is it, Sam?
User avatar
stefano
 
Posts: 2672
Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:50 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby coffin_dodger » Wed Jan 25, 2017 8:14 am

Trump Spokesman Confirms Trump Is A Conspiracy Theorist

This ties in nicely with the System meme-lumping of 'alternate' (alt-right and, by association, alt-news, alt-media etc) as being the gravest menace to civilization.
Being a 'conspiracy theorist', (i.e. disbelieving The State is good and true and correct) is easily (and pretty lazily) shifted onto the Trump persona as a negative trait, so that if you are a conspiracy theorist you are best pals, and in bed with, the dreaded Trump.
However, from the fake news thread:
but the good news is, they are getting easier and easier to spot.

...and they really are.

Trump is so good for the The State in so many ways.
User avatar
coffin_dodger
 
Posts: 2098
Joined: Thu Jun 09, 2011 6:05 am
Location: UK
Blog: View Blog (14)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby Elvis » Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:36 pm

Another example of how the phrase "conspiracy theory" has lost all meaning:



There's a worrying conspiracy theory that Donald Trump can't actually read

https://www.indy100.com/article/donald- ... an-7567481



“Trump can’t read”: Samantha Bee comes up with the best US election conspiracy theory so far

https://qz.com/824550/samantha-bee-come ... cant-read/



In what may be the conspiracy theory of all conspiracy theories [whaaa??] ...Samantha Bee has suggested Donald Trump may not be able to read.

http://news.nationalpost.com/arts/telev ... -cant-read



Samantha Bee’s Trump Conspiracy Theory — Samantha Bee floating out a surprisingly believable conspiracy theory that Donald Trump can't read

http://www.vulture.com/2016/12/10-most- ... -2016.html



So nowadays, any unproved inference or theory—in this case actually more of a hypothesis—is a conspiracy theory.


(You may say, "oh that's just a conspiracy theory," and you may be right.)
Last edited by Elvis on Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
User avatar
Elvis
 
Posts: 6040
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2008 7:24 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby Elvis » Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:42 pm

And for the record: Trump can't read.
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
User avatar
Elvis
 
Posts: 6040
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2008 7:24 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby SonicG » Tue Feb 07, 2017 11:45 pm

Yeah, I guess I really am that old, but regardless of whether he can read, I would challenge anyone to find a single coherent utterance of his that could be considered intelligent or thoughtful...
"a poiminint tidal wave in a notion of dynamite"
User avatar
SonicG
 
Posts: 1182
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:29 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby cptmarginal » Thu Jun 01, 2017 10:02 pm

Image

Named after an obscure association with the French town, chateau and dessert topping, this “census-designated place” of 25,000 people in Fairfax County on the fringes of Washington DC is about to welcome a more controversial kind of cream: the secretive annual meeting of world leaders, CEOs, financiers and power brokers known as the Bilderberg Group.

In fact, Chantilly’s Westfields Marriott hotel, hosting this year’s meeting from 1-4 June, has become the Bilderberg’s home from home in recent times, having also served as the conference’s venue in 2002, 2008 and 2012. Sure to be in attendance are the scrum of protesters, alt-media, conspiracy theorists, Illuminati watchers and anyone else keen to see the world elite turn into lizards after supping blood out of the Holy Grail at midnight..

Silent runnings

Despite the critical mass of movers and shakers either benignly spitballing global policy or carving up the future between themselves (depending on your paranoia levels), Bilderberg flies beneath the radar in Chantilly. Gregg MacDonald, editor of the local Fairfax Times, says most residents remain largely oblivious to proceedings: “I do get a small smattering of letters from people saying, ‘Are you aware of the significance of this?’ But it is a small number.”

The high level of security in Washington DC and Fairfax County’s status as retirement home for prominent public officials (Dick Cheney is a regular at nearby Dulles Airport), allows the conference to keep a low profile. MacDonald believes Chantilly in particular has been carefully selected: “It was very intelligent on someone’s part to have it here because it’s not a village or a town or a city, with its own government. It is simply a census-designated place within Fairfax County. Should they have had it in a town with a provincial government, then they’d have had a whole other layer of governance and bureaucracy [to deal with].”

Chantilly in numbers

46 percentage by which the cost of living in Chantilly is above the US average. Fairfax is the US’ third richest county, behind two other Virginia counties.

10.3bn annual budget in dollars of the National Reconnaissance Office, headquartered here and one of the US’s 16 intelligence agencies

16 kilotonnage equivalent of TNT of the Hiroshima atomic bomb dropped by the Enola Gay, now displayed at the town’s National Air and Space Museum

30,000 sq ft of Chantilly’s forthcoming Lidl, part of the German company’s attempt to break into the US market

[...]

History in 100 words

The Virginia fields 25 miles west of the US capital were mostly tobacco plantations in the early 19th century. The Sully Plantation – situated close to the Little River Turnpike toll road – was a neighbour, pioneering modern farming techniques that were more forgiving than the local tobacco monoculture. Until the mid-19th century, the Sully was in the hands of the influential Lee family – whose famous scion Robert E later instigated the Battle of Chantilly on 1 September 1862 when he ordered “Stonewall” Jackson to cut off a Union retreat. By the 20th century, creeping suburbanisation was pulling Chantilly inescapably into DC’s orbit; its local affluence further swelled by proximity to the north of the Dulles Technology Corridor, a furrow of major tech and aerospace companies stretching from the edge of the capital to Dulles airport. AOL was founded here, and it’s estimated that 70% of the world’s internet traffic passes through servers in the area.

[...]

What’s everyone talking about?

The Trump National Golf Club a few kilometres to the north in Sterling, Virginia, is being used by the new president as a bolthole almost as much as Mar-a-Lago. All eyes have been on the procession of meetings and fundraisers being held out there, not to mention how many hours Trump has been putting in on the greens. “Fairfax is very wealthy, but in a strange juxtaposition it’s also very liberal,” says MacDonald. “So what you have are traditional ‘limousine liberals’ who live here, and Trump’s goings-on annoy them no end.” Last weekend, protesters interrupted the Senior PGA Championship there to make their feelings known.
What’s next for the city?

With the $6.2bn extension of DC’s Silver metro line out to Dulles airport due to be completed in 2019, it seems Chantilly, with the rest of Fairfax County, is being sucked into the capital. Not so, MacDonald says: “The economic developers of the area say that rather than getting pulled into the DC area, we are pulling DC into Fairfax County.”

The presence of one of the country’s largest current infrastructure projects testifies to the economic heft out here. The Tysons Corner area, another part of the Dulles Technology Corridor, is a particular powerhouse, attracting new business and conferences with the dense concentration of office space in this “edge city”. Neighbouring areas like Chantilly are benefitting from the money that tech brings in and, less predictably, from the greater ethnic diversity. With Indian and Pakistani IT workers moving into Fairfax in droves, it’s not quite the Wasp stronghold you might expect: the Asian population accounts for 26%, five times the state average.
Close zoom

The Fairfax Times is the local journal. For more on Bilderberg, you’ll have to rely on the shaggier outposts of alternative media – like YouTube channel Press for Truth, who produced this documentary last time Bilderberg was in Virginia.
cptmarginal
 
Posts: 2488
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2007 8:32 pm
Location: Gordita Beach
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby MacCruiskeen » Sat May 12, 2018 2:36 pm

bump for current hyper-relevance
There sawe I fyrst the derke ymagynyng
Of felony [...]
The pyckpurse and eke the pale drede,
The smyler, with the knyfe under the cloke.
User avatar
MacCruiskeen
 
Posts: 9542
Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2006 6:47 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby JackRiddler » Sat May 12, 2018 8:21 pm

.

In keeping with the social and political developmental tendency of "everything not prohibited will eventually be mandatory," conspiracy theory now refers solely to the refusal to accept and repeat, without alteration, every statement published by the Western corporate and state media and its associated pundits and analysts regarding the malevolent omnipresence of unseen and relentless Russian state agents who, on direct orders from their Big Bad in the Kremlin, are wholly responsible for: fixing U.S. election results; causing Americans to dislike the greatest and most accomplished human leader in history; running the NRA; organizing Black Lives Matter; inventing and weaponizing the unprecedented phenomenon of news stories that are inaccurate, untrue, slanted, or hoaxed; teaching Christian fundamentalists everything they believe; appearing to be capable of thinking silently about hacking exploits that haven't actually happened but could potentially destroy the entire electrical grid if they did, according to a new think-tank study; writing every article in Consortium News and Counterpunch, except the ones by Louis Proyect; confusing Kanye West; and using hundreds and possibly thousands of dollars in Facebook ads to make the Internet impolite, turning brother against brother, ending the long era of harmony and consensus in American politics and of benevolent U.S. world leadership.

.
We meet at the borders of our being, we dream something of each others reality. - Harvey of R.I.

To Justice my maker from on high did incline:
I am by virtue of its might divine,
The highest Wisdom and the first Love.

TopSecret WallSt. Iraq & more
User avatar
JackRiddler
 
Posts: 14316
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 2:59 pm
Location: New York City
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby Elvis » Fri Jul 06, 2018 8:56 pm

Bump.

I didn't read the 'talk' notes, so not sure when it happened, but Wikipedia has officially defined "conspiracy theory":`

A conspiracy theory is an explanation of an event or situation that invokes an unwarranted conspiracy


I think that definition is unwarranted. It's stupid. It's fucked up and bullshit. All meaning in the phrase is now subjective. Why can't an unwarranted conspiracy theory just be called an "unwarranted conspiracy theory"? Why must a two-word phrase which has a perfectly clear meaning be rendered meaningless, except to be used as a weapon by corporate media and self-appointed 'thought police'?

Was this Wikipedia definition the result of a conspiracy? I should read the editorial talk notes; when I do maybe I'll post them if no one else does it first (hint hint).

Especially galling is the chorus of "conspiracy theories are a danger to society!" Ha! — this quote Mac (I think) posted earlier:

This label becomes dangerous machinery at the transpersonal levels of media and academic discourse, symbolically stripping the claimant of the status of reasonable interlocutor—often to avoid the need to account for one's own action or speech. We argue that this and similar mechanisms simultaneously control the flow of information and symbolically demobilize certain voices and issues in public discourse.

http://www.researchgate.net/publication ... _Exclusion
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
User avatar
Elvis
 
Posts: 6040
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2008 7:24 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby Elvis » Fri Jul 06, 2018 9:17 pm

OED got it right (as cited by Wilipedia):

The Oxford English Dictionary defines conspiracy theory as "the theory that an event or phenomenon occurs as a result of a conspiracy between interested parties


Plain, simple, means something.
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
User avatar
Elvis
 
Posts: 6040
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2008 7:24 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby RocketMan » Wed Apr 17, 2019 9:08 am

Phew, FOUND IT. This thread, I mean. Here's another doozy from the New Yorker.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019 ... -gI5KC5gfs

After standard issue concern trolling about conspiracy theories, this:

In this context, Pizzagate and QAnon could be considered madness as usual—just two late-alphabet entries in the annals of national crankdom. But is that all there is to it? Or are deeper, darker forces at work? A confirmed conspiracist now occupies the White House and, “no collusion” notwithstanding, there’s evidence that an international conspiracy put him there. Coincidence? To paraphrase Q, perhaps it’s time to “expand our thinking.”


I don't know if that's irony, sarcasm, or whatever... I just can't even. :farmer:
-I don't like hoodlums.
-That's just a word, Marlowe. We have that kind of world. Two wars gave it to us and we are going to keep it.
User avatar
RocketMan
 
Posts: 2445
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 7:02 am
Location: By the rivers dark
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby stickdog99 » Wed Apr 17, 2019 5:33 pm

RocketMan » 17 Apr 2019 13:08 wrote:Phew, FOUND IT. This thread, I mean. Here's another doozy from the New Yorker.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019 ... -gI5KC5gfs

After standard issue concern trolling about conspiracy theories, this:

In this context, Pizzagate and QAnon could be considered madness as usual—just two late-alphabet entries in the annals of national crankdom. But is that all there is to it? Or are deeper, darker forces at work? A confirmed conspiracist now occupies the White House and, “no collusion” notwithstanding, there’s evidence that an international conspiracy put him there. Coincidence? To paraphrase Q, perhaps it’s time to “expand our thinking.”


I don't know if that's irony, sarcasm, or whatever... I just can't even. :farmer:


Time for a Mistrel Boy sequel? A Coincidence Theorist's Guide to Conspiracy Theories?
stickdog99
 
Posts: 3413
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2005 5:42 am
Blog: View Blog (0)

Re: [Poll] A sticky thread for "'CT' in the media"?

Postby Elvis » Fri Apr 19, 2019 4:46 am

NPR's "This American Life" did a show on "conspiracy theories" that almost caused me to pull my luxurious hair out, or, worse, get out of bed and email the dumbshits.

https://www.thisamericanlife.org/671/transcript
Ira Glass

Of course, it's no surprise that the president has spun the Mueller report into a conspiracy theory of his own, because he's peddled lots of conspiracy theories, from the idea that George Soros is funding the caravans, all the way back to birtherism. Joe Uscinski, a professor at the University of Miami who studies conspiracy theories and the people who believe them, says, this is actually an unusual thing about today.

Zoe Chace
I got this book recommendation that made a big impression on me from Paula. She and her partner, Steve, drove three hours from Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

[tape]
Paula
What's the name of that book?

Steve
Oh, I can't remember.

Paula
Baby, look for it on my--

Steve
It's an older book.

Paula
--Amazon. It's an old, old book. But it's about how they've been trying to do this for many years in America.

Steve
Yeah, since the middle 1800s.

Paula
Yes. They've been--

Zoe Chace
Who's they, though?

Steve
The Illuminati, whatever you want to call them-- the World Order.


Ira Glass
The World Order?

Zoe Chace
Basically, the idea that a cabal of rich guys is trying to take over the world and create one world government-- like one currency, one army, no national borders.



There's where I wanted to get out of bed and email them: "I think you just described everyday neoliberalism."
"Frankly, I don't think it's a good idea but the sums proposed are enormous."
User avatar
Elvis
 
Posts: 6040
Joined: Fri Apr 11, 2008 7:24 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)

PreviousNext

Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 19 guests