Palestine

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Palestine

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Oct 15, 2015 5:55 pm

Now the time has come
There are things to realize
Time has come today


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAScA6YUT30

Blacks and Palestinians Unite and Unify in Visual Production
A new video outlines the common struggles of Blacks in America and Palestinians in the Middle East
OCTOBER 14, 2015


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsdpg-9cmSw
WHEN I SEE THEM I SEE US
Activists in both America and Palestine are lending their voices to a new international cause that connects the streets of the United States, where conflicts between African Americans and law enforcement have intensified and Palestine where conflicts between Palestinians and Israeli forces continue.

They have produced a video entitled "When I See Them I See Us" featuring more than 60 artists and activists who are addressing the issues in both areas of the world, which draws comparisons between the tension in Ferguson, Mo., in the wake of the police killing of Michael Brown and the dropping of explosives by Israel in the Gaza Strip around the same time in 2014.

Organizations including the Dream Defenders, Black Youth Project 100, the DC Palestinian Film and Arts Festival and the Arab Studies Institute collaborated on the project. Which also brought together artists like Danny Glover, Lauren Hill, LisaGay Hamilton and Alice Walker.

“Palestinians have spoken out passionately against racist police violence in Ferguson and Baltimore as black people have vehemently stood up in defense of (Arab American Action Network associate director) Rasmeah Odeh," said activist Angela Davis in a statement from the group. "That the Palestinian people have refused to surrender after almost seven decades of continuous struggle against Israeli settler colonialism is a great encouragement to black people in the U.S. to accelerate our ongoing struggles against racist state violence. These powerful images represent a journey from struggle against tyranny to a collective hope for a just future.”
More importantly, the way Cambridge Analytica gained access to some 30 million Facebook accounts without users’ consent, along with private voting records, raises serious privacy concerns.
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Re: Palestine

Postby Grizzly » Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:39 pm

When I see them I see us ...

That's because Chuck Wexler and his ilk, of Police Executive Research Forum or (PERF), trained all our police captains across this nation with Israel Defense Forces (IDF).

From Occupation to ‘Occupy’: The Israelification of American domestic security
Training alongside the American police departments at Urban Shield was the Yamam, an Israeli Border Police unit that claims to specialize in “counter-terror” operations but is better known for its extra-judicial assassinations of Palestinian militant leaders and long record of repression and abuses in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. Urban Shield also featured a unit from the military of Bahrain, which had just crushed a largely non-violent democratic uprising by opening fire on protest camps and arresting wounded demonstrators when they attempted to enter hospitals. While the involvement of Bahraini soldiers in the drills was a novel phenomenon, the presence of quasi-military Israeli police – whose participation in Urban Shield was not reported anywhere in US media – reflected a disturbing but all-too-common feature of the post-9/11 American security landscape.

The Israelification of America’s security apparatus, recently unleashed in full force against the Occupy Wall Street Movement, has taken place at every level of law enforcement, and in areas that have yet to be exposed. The phenomenon has been documented in bits and pieces, through occasional news reports that typically highlight Israel’s national security prowess without examining the problematic nature of working with a country accused of grave human rights abuses. But it has never been the subject of a national discussion. And collaboration between American and Israeli cops is just the tip of the iceberg.

Having been schooled in Israeli tactics perfected during a 63 year experience of controlling, dispossessing, and occupying an indigenous population, local police forces have adapted them to monitor Muslim and immigrant neighborhoods in US cities. Meanwhile, former Israeli military officers have been hired to spearhead security operations at American airports and suburban shopping malls, leading to a wave of disturbing incidents of racial profiling, intimidation, and FBI interrogations of innocent, unsuspecting people. The New York Police Department’s disclosure that it deployed “counter-terror” measures against Occupy protesters encamped in downtown Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park raised serious questions about the extent to which Israeli-inspired tactics have been used to suppress the Occupy movement in general.

The process of Israelification began in the immediate wake of 9/11, when national panic led federal and municipal law enforcement officials to beseech Israeli security honchos for advice and training. America’s Israel lobby exploited the climate of hysteria, providing thousands of top cops with all-expenses paid trips to Israel and stateside training sessions with Israeli military and intelligence officials. By now, police chiefs of major American cities who have not been on junkets to Israel are the exception.

“Israel is the Harvard of antiterrorism,” said former US Capitol Police Chief Terrance W. Gainer, who now serves as the US Senate Sergeant-at-Arms. Cathy Lanier, the Chief of the Washington DC Metropolitan Police, remarked, “No experience in my life has had more of an impact on doing my job than going to Israel.” “One would say it is the front line,” Barnett Jones, the police chief of Ann Arbor, Michigan, said of Israel. “We're in a global war.”

Karen Greenberg, the director of Fordham School of Law’s Center on National Security and a leading expert on terror and civil liberties, said the Israeli influence on American law enforcement is so extensive it has bled into street-level police conduct. “After 9/11 we reached out to the Israelis on many fronts and one of those fronts was torture,” Greenberg told me. “The training in Iraq and Afghanistan on torture was Israeli training. There’s been a huge downside to taking our cue from the Israelis and now we’re going to spread that into the fabric of everyday American life? It’s counter-terrorism creep. And it’s exactly what you could have predicted would have happened.”

Changing the way we do business


Chuck Wexler, the executive director of PERF, was so enthusiastic about the program that by 2005 he had begun organizing trips to Israel sponsored by PERF, bringing numerous high-level American police officials to receive instruction from their Israeli counterparts.

PERF gained notoriety when Wexler confirmed that his group coordinated police raids in 16 cities across America against “Occupy” protest encampments. As many as 40 cities have sought PERF advice on suppressing the “Occupy” movement and other mass protest activities. Wexler did not respond to my requests for an interview.

Lessons from Israel to Auschwitz


http://www.moonofalabama.org/2011/12/se ... 45058d970d


Paramilitary Policing of OWS: Excessive Use of Force Amidst the New Military Urbanism
If Barthes can forgive me, “What the public wants is the image of passion Justice, not passion Justice itself.”
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Re: Palestine

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:19 pm

New deputy defense minister called Palestinians ‘animals’
Jewish Home MK Eli Ben Dahan to oversee the authorization of travel and entry permits for Palestinians in West Bank, Gaza

BY TAMAR PILEGGI May 11, 2015, 1:31 am 20

As part of the coalition agreement reached between Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the Jewish Home party on Thursday, MK Eli Ben Dahan, a rabbi who’s made controversial statements about Palestinians and non-Jews, will serve as Israel’s next deputy defense minister.

Under the new job description, Ben Dahan, who served as the deputy religious affairs minister in the previous government, will also be responsible for the IDF’s Civil Administration running government affairs in the West Bank.

Ben Dahan has made controversial remarks about Palestinians. While discussing the resumption of peace talks in a radio interview in 2013, Ben Dahan said that “To me, they are like animals, they aren’t human.”

“The Palestinians aren’t educated towards peace, nor to they want it,” he said.

The Civil Administration is an IDF unit subordinate to the Defense Ministry responsible for governing West Bank planning, building and infrastructure in Israeli-controlled Area C. In addition, it is responsible for authorizing Palestinian travel and entry permits into Israel from Gaza and the West Bank.

Later that year, while discussing his opposition to Knesset legislation that would offer same-sex parents the same tax breaks as their heterosexual counterparts, Ben Dahan told Maariv that homosexual Jews were superior than gentiles — gay or straight.

“A Jew always has a much higher soul than a gentile, even if he is a homosexual,” he said.

Ben Dahan said that his opposition to the bill was not based on discrimination, but stemmed from his commitment to uphold the Jewish character of Israel.

“I have to keep the state Jewish. Things that contradict the values, culture or tradition will not receive a stamp of approval,” he said.
More importantly, the way Cambridge Analytica gained access to some 30 million Facebook accounts without users’ consent, along with private voting records, raises serious privacy concerns.
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Re: Palestine

Postby seemslikeadream » Fri Oct 16, 2015 10:20 am

Image



http://www.ipsc.ie/the-issues/historical-background


The Issues

Since September 2000

4,274 Palestinians killed
952 Palestinian children killed
31,531 Palestinians wounded
4,170 Palestinian homes demolished
In 2006

647 Palestinians killed
119 Palestinian children killed
1,809 Palestinians wounded
319 Palestinian homes demolished
Current Facts

11,700 Palestinians are currently imprisoned
Israeli unemployment is 9%, Palestinian unemployment is estimated at 40%.
The U.S. gives more than $7,023,288 per day to the Israeli government and military.
Since 1967 Israel has demolished 18,147 Palestinian homes, leaving over 100,000 people without shelter.
Israel has been targeted by at least 65 UN resolutions and the Palestinians have been targeted by none.


Background to the conflict

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Palestinian loss of land 1946 to 2000
In 1850 Palestine was populated by Arabs, 400,000 (80%) Muslims, 75,000 Christians, 25,000 Jews and a small Druze population. For centuries they had lived in harmony. In the late 1800s, in response to discrimination and violence against them some European Jews decided to establish a Jewish state and investigated a number of different countries before choosing Palestine. These colonisers became known as Zionists.

At first the influx of small numbers of Zionists into Palestine created no problems. As more and more Zionists arrived — many with the express intention of establishing a Jewish state — the indigenous population became alarmed. This eventually gave rise to escalating waves of violence.

After World War II the fledgling UN, dominated by the USA and the UK, recommended partitioning Palestine. Although Jews constituted only one-third of the population and owned less than 7 percent of the land, the UN recommended ceding 56 percent of Palestinian land to a Jewish state, against the wishes of the indigenous Palestinian majority.

In November 1947 the UN General Assembly passed its partition resolution. In March 1948, Zionist terrorists began a pre-planned, brutal campaign of ethnic cleansing forcing Palestinians from their land in order to create a Jewish majority. Over 750,000 Palestinians were forced from their homes, farms and villages by Zionist terrorists – 250,000 of them before the declaration of the state of Israel – and became refugees.

On 15th May 1948 the British Mandate ended and the State of Israel came into effect with no defined borders. The armies of Egypt, Transjordan (Jordan), Syria, Lebanon, and Iraq joined Palestinians to resist Zionist plans for the conquest of Palestine, but were defeated.

The 1949 armistice agreements gave Israel control over 78 percent of the territory of British Mandate Palestine. Jordan controlled East Jerusalem and the West Bank. Egypt took temporary control of the coastal plain later known as the Gaza Strip.

In 1967, Israel invaded the West Bank and Gaza, an area with an Arab population of about 1.5 million. This resulted in the dispossession of a further half a million Palestinians. In 1983, Israel invaded Lebanon. Tens of thousands were killed and made homeless in the wake of the invasion which culminated in the massacres of Sabra and Shatilla.

In December 1987, a mass uprising against the Israeli occupation began (the Intifada). Israeli forces reacted with force causing mass injuries and heavy loss of life among the civilian Palestinian population.

In 1995 Israeli and Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) officials finalised agreement on the second stage of eventual Israeli withdrawal from Palestinian lands.

However Israel continued its policies of land confiscation and house demolition, doubling the number of illegal colonies on Palestinian land.

In 2002, the Israeli government began construction of the apartheid Wall, demolishing more homes and confiscating even more Palestinian land. In 2004 the International Court of Justice declared the wall illegal.

In 2005 Israel withdrew its illegal settlers from Gaza while tightening its stranglehold on the territory.

In January 2006, Hamas won the Palestinian elections. Israel, the US, and the EU refused to recognise the democratically elected government. The EU and USA cut off aid and Israel withheld taxes from the Palestinian Authority.

In 2006, Israel attacked Lebanon and Gaza killing nearly 2000 people, the vast majority of whom were civilians. Amnesty International described Israel’s actions as “serious violations of international human rights and humanitarian law, including war crimes”. The EU took no action against Israel. Britain and America facilitated the rapid rearming of Israel as it bombed civilian neighbourhoods and decimated the infrastructure of Lebanon and Gaza.

In the first six months of 2007, Israel killed 117 and injured 299 Palestinians. Internal pressures, exacerbated by the impact of the Israeli siege of Gaza and the withholding of aid and taxes resulted in Fatah taking control in the West Bank and Hamas in the Gaza Strip. Tony Blair was appointed envoy to the Middle East Quartet.




Steven Salaita in NYC: ‘It’s not just Israel and Palestine that get people in trouble – it’s challenging power’
Activism Rob Bryan on October 15, 2015

Steven Salaita (Photo: American University of Beirut) Steven Salaita (Photo: American University of Beirut)

Humility is not generally a word associated with iconoclasts. Yet Professor Steven Salaita, speaking in the dimly-lit basement of an East Village bar last week, was nothing if not humble. He spoke little of his own career difficulties, of which most of the small audience was no doubt already familiar. His new gig – as the Edward W. Said Chair of American Studies at the American University of Beirut – got barely a mention. Instead, he used his short time on stage to express his unwavering solidarity with the activists fighting to end Israeli apartheid in the face of formidable barriers (both from pro-Israel groups and school administrators) – barriers that includes restrictions on speech and the attempted blacklist of anti-Zionists.

Salaita was dismissed last year from his post as a professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois before he could even start teaching. The punishable crime was a series of tweets angrily denouncing Israel’s invasion of Gaza during Operation Protective Edge, written during the worst of the carnage. Though issues of freedom and power have been part of Salita’s teaching and writing for years, in the year and change since his unjust firing he has also become somewhat of a public figure and free speech advocate, visiting college campuses and talking to activists from Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) and other groups about their experience with similar forms of academic censorship.

Organized by the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) and Palestine Legal, the discussion was planned to coincide with the recent release of a report co-written by the two organizations titled “The Palestine Exception to Free Speech.” A brief description of the report on the CCR website states that between January 2014 and June 2015, Palestine Legal “responded to nearly 300 incidents of suppression; 85% of those incidents targeted students and professors, on a total of more than 65 US college campuses.” In response, Palestine legal has provided legal advice, litigation support, and other services to advocates for Palestinian liberation while also tracking attempts to shut down activism on college campuses and elsewhere.

Image

The gathering also functioned as an informal book party for Uncivil Rites: Palestine and the Limits of Academic Freedom, Salaita’s new book about the University of Illinois controversy. According to a blurb by Angela Davis, the book turns his ousting “into an opportunity to elevate the campaign for Palestine solidarity to a new level.” The aim, in other words, is not simply autobiography but rather a rallying cry to turn an unfortunate experience into one that can be publicized and learned from.

A short documentary-style video projected onto a pull-down screen served as an introduction to the night’s themes. The video featured several talking heads, including several young Palestinian activists and Brooklyn College professor Corey Robin (one of Salaita’s most tireless online defenders). Robin talked about the paranoia permeating SJP events, at which the imagined threat of terrorism led to excessive security measures.

Next up was Omar Shakir, a Fellow at CCR, who enumerated the methods by which Israel advocacy groups convince institutions to punish those who fight for Palestinian rights. These methods include cancellations of academic events, administrative sanctions, lawsuits, criminal investigations, and, of course, firings. Shakir stressed that though the report is “based on hundreds of interviews” conducted by Palestine Legal and CCR, it refers to “only those instances that were reported by Palestine Legal. It’s not an exhaustive list – plenty of incidents go unreported.” Introducing the main speaker, Shakir declared, “There is no better person to speak about these issues than Steven Salaita.”

When Salaita finally spoke, he sounded every bit the university professor, eloquently expounding on everything from the corporatization of the modern college campus to the institutional racism facing SJP members around the country. Summing up the risks of speaking out against injustice, he said, “It’s not just Israel and Palestine that get people in trouble – it’s challenging power. It’s a matter of coercion, a matter of elite remonstration and the need for capital to generate docile consumers.” Bemoaning the disingenuous emphasis on “balance,” he commented, “The very idea of a voice raised in support of Palestine must be seen through the nonsensical trope of balance with a Zionist voice.” He proceeded to communicate his heartfelt support for SJP, saying:

We see what you’re doing and we see the blood sweat and tears. We know it’s not always acknowledged but your work is crucial. You are an example to set for the rest of us, pointing to a way that does not involve inhabiting the world that they want us to inhabit.

His admiration for the student group – smeared as one of the “Top 10 Anti-Israel Groups in America” by the Anti-Defamation League – was more than evident.

Salaita was dismayed by what he described as the “chill” he felt on campus when it came to free speech. What’s clear is that the censorship that exists on campus is not government censorship, strictly speaking. It is unlikely that the U.S. would ever produce something like Israel’s “Nakba law,” which forbids teaching about the hundreds of thousands of refugees created by Israel’s ethnic cleansing in 1948. No, hegemony in the U.S. is more insidious than that. The predominant view of the ruling class in this country – that Israel must be defended in word and deed regardless of how horribly it may treat Palestinians – trickles down to college campuses in the form of baseless legal actions, disciplinary measures, and endless accusation of terrorism, anti-Semitism, and Jewish self-hatred. This is particularly true on campuses where the BDS movement and SJP activists have gained a strong foothold.

Luckily, the atmosphere at the talk was not all doom-and-gloom. BDS and the growing awareness of Israeli occupation and discrimination have provided not just a target for Zionist attacks but a base from which to grow a grassroots movement with the possibility to dismantle Israel’s structure of oppression – a structure whose influence can be felt from Tel Aviv to Berkeley. Palestine activism may face more obstacles than ever, but there is also a palpable feeling of possibility in the air – the possibility that those struggling for Palestinian liberation will not simply be heard, but will win.
More importantly, the way Cambridge Analytica gained access to some 30 million Facebook accounts without users’ consent, along with private voting records, raises serious privacy concerns.
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Re: Palestine

Postby AlicetheKurious » Sat Oct 17, 2015 5:35 am

In this video, can you tell who are the Palestinian demonstrators and who are the Zionist occupation forces? Perception management is one of the most powerful weapons in the Zionist arsenal. "By way of deception shalt thou do war."



By Lisa Goldman |Published October 9, 2015
When people can't believe their eyes, it's usually ideology
+972 published video of undercover Israeli soldiers restraining a Palestinian stone thrower and shooting him point blank in the leg. An astonishing number of people looked at the evidence and refused to believe what they saw.


Yesterday I published a post about a video that showed Israeli plainclothes undercover soldiers restraining a Palestinian youth at a West Bank demonstration and shooting him in the leg at point blank range. The youth was clutching a small stone, but was otherwise unarmed.

These undercover agents are called ”mistarevim” in Hebrew (meaning disguised as an Arab) and “mustarabeen” in Arabic. According to reports from several sources, including the AFP, journalists witnessed a group of mistarevim infiltrating a demonstration in the West Bank and then suddenly producing handguns, which they shot directly at the Palestinian protestors.

At one point two of the undercover troops grab one of the Palestinian young men and restrain him, while a third presses the barrel of his handgun to his thigh and pulls the trigger. The ‘pop’ of the weapon is audible. Uniformed soldiers punch and kick the wounded youth and then drag him away.

A still image taken at the scene by Activestills photojournalist Muhannad Saleem shows the youth being carried away on a stretcher by soldiers wearing the latex gloves used by medics. There is a tourniquet tied around his thigh above a bleeding wound, and he is wearing an oxygen mask.

Image
Israeli army medics carry away a young Palestinian stone thrower who was shot in the leg by undercover Israeli troops on the outskirts of Ramallah. A tourniquet can be seen on his leg where he was shot, October 7, 2015. (Muhannad Saleem/Activestills.org)

An astonishing number of people looked at all this evidence and refused to believe what they saw. And they were upset with the messenger, too. Yesterday +972 editor Michael Schaeffer Omer-Man and I were inundated with testy emails and social media messages from people who demanded additional evidence proving the undercover agent had really pulled the trigger and shot the boy.

The multiple witnesses, the videos and the photographs were not enough. Some claimed they did not hear the gun being discharged. Others claimed they saw the Palestinian youth walking after he’d supposedly been shot, which proved that the undercover officer had not really pulled the trigger. On Facebook, there were long threads of comments claiming the video was fabricated, a “Pallywood” production.

But then the army spokesperson responded to our query and confirmed nonchalantly that yes, the shooting had occurred as witnessed and documented. “It was an accurate shot that disabled the central suspect who fought back even after the soldiers attempted to arrest him,” said the spokesperson, in a statement that we appended to the original post. No apology, no attempt to dispute.

The army apparently believes it’s acceptable to restrain an unarmed protestor and “disable” him by shooting him at point blank range in the leg.

These undercover units have existed for years, and so has the practice of having agents — sometimes police, sometimes army — infiltrate demonstrations and violently detain protestors. So, too, has the practice of assaulting, and even shooting, unarmed civilians when they are physically restrained and unable to defend themselves. Former undercover officers have spoken about their experiences in interviews for Israeli documentary films, and Breaking the Silence has documented these practices in interviews with former soldiers.

The tactics of the undercover units are actually well known. But this is the first time we’ve seen such vivid, indisputable video evidence. And now we have the army’s acknowledgement that not only do they know about these practices, but they sanction them.

So now I have Jewish friends asking me nervously what they should think. They want to believe these practices are rare and committed by outliers who act in contravention of accepted procedure. But that is not the case, and that is what I tell them. It’s not easy for them, because most Jews cherish the idea that Israel is somehow better, or that Jews wouldn’t do things like that. Too many American Jews have outsourced their identity to Israel, and now they are not sure what to do with the creeping existential crisis.

The thing is, I’ve never seen anyone question or demand more evidence in cases where the media reported that a Palestinian had carried out a violent attack. None of my Jewish friends or journalist colleagues seem to dispute that Fadi Alloun, the Palestinian youth who was shot by police four days ago after stabbing a Jewish teenager in Jerusalem, actually carried out the stabbing.

I’ve seen plenty of people dispute whether or not Jews actually carried out the “price tag” arson attack on the Dawabshe family, too, despite the Hebrew graffiti at the scene and the security forces’ certitude that the crime was committed by Jewish settlers who lived nearby (although they still haven’t managed to charge anybody with the crime). Meanwhile, the Jewish teenager who attacked Arab citizens in Dimona with a knife has been handed over for psychiatric assessment rather than arrested and charged with attempted murder.

There’s something quite racist in the implicit assumption that when Palestinians commit random acts of political violence they’re motivated by senseless hatred, while a Jew who does the same to an Arab just needs a psychiatrist. The same goes for this unwillingness to believe that an Israeli undercover officer would actually shoot a Palestinian in the leg — then kick him in the abdomen and head and drag him several meters along a rock strewn road, as though he were an animal carcass or a sack of potatoes — despite all the evidence.


Perhaps the muted expressions of disquiet over these images are a sign that caring people with liberal values are starting to wake up to a fact that should be self evident: you can’t maintain military rule over an unwilling population without engaging in acts of cruel violence. Link
"If you're not careful the newspapers will have you hating the oppressed and loving the people doing the oppressing." - Malcolm X
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Re: Palestine

Postby 82_28 » Sat Oct 17, 2015 5:46 am

Can anyone explain finally when you are armed to the teeth with advanced weapons/communications and air support how someone throwing rocks at your battalion is in any form a "threat"?

Other than racism. . .
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Re: Palestine

Postby zangtang » Sat Oct 17, 2015 11:07 am

As the 'only functioning democracy in the region' (tm) and wholly 'surrounded by people that want to kill them' (tm)
its important to remember, in case any of us should forget, that they are an oppressed minority, unconscionably victimised
throughout history, possibly as a result of being the superior race, as evidenced by being 'God's chosen people' (tm)

Obviously, being God's chosen people confers rights, and as such the, to some unfortunate, but ultimately inconsequential,
right to smite one's enemies, including women & children, is also an obligation....such that to not smite said enemies would
be a sin in the eyes of God, & it is therefore easy to see that such God ordained smiting is the will of God & shall continue
until there is no more enemy-smiting to be done. So much easier to accept when one realises that if one is not chosen,
one is Goy.....or cattle.
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Re: Palestine

Postby Wombaticus Rex » Sat Oct 17, 2015 12:32 pm

82_28 » Sat Oct 17, 2015 4:46 am wrote:Can anyone explain finally when you are armed to the teeth with advanced weapons/communications and air support how someone throwing rocks at your battalion is in any form a "threat"?

Other than racism. . .


Is this a serious question? I'd assume you were being rhetorically sly, except for that bit about racism. Once you're committed to totalitarianism, any threat is serious. There is no innocent dissent. Peace is a graveyard.

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Israeli racism is a funny thing. Literally: a very funny thing.

A Jewish man who was mistaken for an Arab and stabbed by a fellow Israeli Jew bent on avenging recent knife attacks in Israel denounced ethnically motivated violence in interviews with the local news media.

Uri Rezken, the victim of the botched revenge attack, was stabbed in the back on Tuesday as he worked at a market in the Haifa suburb of Kiryat Ata.

“I’m working, and suddenly I feel four knife stabs in my back,” he told Israel’s Army Radio on Wednesday. “I heard a shout, ‘You deserve it, you deserve it, Arab bastards!’ When I turn around I see a Haredi man. I shouted to him, ‘I’m a Jew,’ but he tried to continue. I just ran away; otherwise I would have been killed.”

As Jessica Montell, an Israeli rights activist, noted, the victim also rejected the premise that his attacker’s confusion mattered at all. “If I were Arab, it still wouldn’t have been O.K. You shouldn’t stab anybody,” Mr. Rezken said.


But to answer your question: kids throwing rocks are not going to stop with rocks. It makes pragmatic sense when your goal is protecting your citizens -- especially from the consequences of their actions -- to treat them as combatants. Israel is an ethnic state. Invoking "racism" is superfluous.
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Re: Palestine

Postby General Patton » Sat Oct 17, 2015 12:54 pm

штрафбат вперед
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Re: Palestine

Postby tapitsbo » Sat Oct 17, 2015 12:59 pm

Also: as offensive as Israel's actions are, focusing on them in isolation to the exclusion of other states and actors simply provides more fuel for the country's exceptionalism.

This is a country that needs to be understood as not simply an exception, but also a part of a spectrum of authoritarian states including the US, UK, Russia, etc.
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Re: Palestine

Postby zangtang » Sat Oct 17, 2015 2:19 pm

is it not the exceptionalism that is the problem?
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Re: Palestine

Postby AlicetheKurious » Sat Oct 17, 2015 2:42 pm

tapitsbo » Sat Oct 17, 2015 6:59 pm wrote:Also: as offensive as Israel's actions are, focusing on them in isolation to the exclusion of other states and actors simply provides more fuel for the country's exceptionalism.

This is a country that needs to be understood as not simply an exception, but also a part of a spectrum of authoritarian states including the US, UK, Russia, etc.


But it is an exception. This is, to my knowledge, the only state on Earth that has no legal borders, and no declared borders; that denies even basic human and civil and property rights to nearly one-half of its inhabitants, but describes itself as the state of "the Jews", and openly invites foreign Jews who don't live there, never have, and have no family roots there to obtain citizenship and subsidies and property legally owned by the natives. It is the only racist colonial genocidal state on Earth that describes itself as "an island of democracy" and is treated as such by the 'international community'. It's the only state on Earth that was granted conditional membership in the UN only after committing itself to repatriating the refugees it had ethnically cleansed, but instead escalated its ethnic cleansing before the eyes of the world, yet is allowed to stay in the UN, even to harangue the UN members to sanction and even launch wars against countries that have violated no laws at all. It is the only nuclear-armed state in the Middle East, with hundreds of nuclear warheads, is not a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and is not pressured at all to submit its nuclear arsenal to inspections. It's the only state on Earth that all American presidential candidates must pledge undying allegiance to (even above their own country), and be convincing, or else.

It is the only state on Earth that would literally cease to exist as soon as it stopped committing war crimes and crimes against humanity, therefore its "right to exist" effectively means "its right to commit war crimes and crimes against humanity," a right that is recognized and defended on moral grounds by powerful Western states.

And that's just off the top of my head. There's no question at all: Israel is indeed exceptional.
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Re: Palestine

Postby tapitsbo » Sat Oct 17, 2015 2:49 pm

Of course it is and represents an extreme, as well. But Israel's whole justification for what it does is that it's faced "exceptional" criticism
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Re: Palestine

Postby 82_28 » Sat Oct 17, 2015 2:59 pm

Yes it was both rhetorical and serious. Throwing rocks is not a threat that were I armed would perceive as a deadly threat. I would walk over to the rock throwers and explain why we are the threat and you are not and something needs to be done about this -- such as dropping and destroying my firepower and shaking hands then starting up a farm in unity. Something along those lines.

Some kid would throw rocks at me and it would scare me when I was in kindergarten, even without armor and shit like that I would reach out to that kid and form a dialogue with what I know today.

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Honestly, I have no clue because neither side is something I would engage in period. I would sit in a circle free of hate and hope to make it build from there. I would tell them both they're both stupid and to knock it off. Let's just :hug1:
There is no me. There is no you. There is all. There is no you. There is no me. And that is all. A profound acceptance of an enormous pageantry. A haunting certainty that the unifying principle of this universe is love. -- Propagandhi
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Re: Palestine

Postby slimmouse » Sat Oct 17, 2015 3:50 pm

One of the key reasons that I no longer participate in such debates, is that it is now beyond doubt in my own mind that the vast majority of Israel/Israelis are as much victims of the whole current Global insanity as the rest of every other fucker here reading this.

Get our heads around this fact and we might possibly proceed. :thumbsup
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