Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby Pele'sDaughter » Wed Sep 07, 2016 10:18 am

At least you know it wasn't grown in a lab, ha ha.
Don't believe anything they say.
And at the same time,
Don't believe that they say anything without a reason.
---Immanuel Kant
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby yathrib » Wed Sep 07, 2016 11:01 am

Food you don't see anymore: organ meats, including liver. I recently found that I had mild anemia, and that liver had a high amount of bioavailable iron. I thought I would start eating liver once a week rather than taking iron pills which would probably mostly end up in my urine anyway... The catch: no mainstream grocery sells it anymore. I haven't yet checked out Whole Paycheck.

EDIT: I have it on decent authority that many traditional cultures prize the organ meats for their nutrient density, and give the muscle meats to the dogs.
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby Luther Blissett » Wed Sep 07, 2016 11:27 am

I don't know if I live in an old-fashioned city or what the problem is. This thread makes me feel delusional. I see butchers, roadside fruit and vegetable stands, kids playing outside etc all the time.
The Rich and the Corporate remain in their hundred-year fever visions of Bolsheviks taking their stuff - JackRiddler
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby 82_28 » Wed Sep 07, 2016 11:48 am

You clearly live in a time warp upon a flat planet.
There is no me. There is no you. There is all. There is no you. There is no me. And that is all. A profound acceptance of an enormous pageantry. A haunting certainty that the unifying principle of this universe is love. -- Propagandhi
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby lucky » Thu Sep 08, 2016 7:16 am

In the UK up to about 1980's we had x3 TV channels then x4 in 82 and around the same time all the channels shut down about midnight and the BBC use to play the national anthem.

In offices now, nearly everyone works with a PC what did they all do pre-computer age?.

IN the 70's it was quite normal for starters at a restaurant to include a small glass of bottled fruit juice.
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the holes are small
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby yathrib » Sat Sep 10, 2016 7:51 pm

I was wondering about the seeming disappearance of rollerblading... Although I personally stopped because of two weekends of consecutive ER visits, the second time for a gnarly ankle injury that still flairs up every few weeks or so. This article connects it to the Mood of Seriousness after 9/11...

https://thecauldron.si.com/did-9-11-kil ... .bkayi2djf
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby Cordelia » Mon Jan 09, 2017 12:01 pm

Talking Heads/reporters not beginning their answers to an interviewer's questions with "So....." :wallhead:
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby norton ash » Mon Jan 09, 2017 1:14 pm

^^^ This. The 'so' beginning to a statement ... interviewers and interviewees, very noticeable, and I have friends who concur that it really is a new thing.
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby Cordelia » Mon Jan 09, 2017 2:07 pm

Business consultant Hunter Thurman gives three reasons for avoiding the practice of beginning a sentence with so:

1. “So” insults your audience.
2. “So undermines your credibility.
3. “So” demonstrates that you’re not 100% comfortable with what you’re saying.

PR consultant Cherry Chapell, on the other hand, sees this use of so as “a good way of giving yourself time to think.”

Linguistics professor Penelope Gardner-Chloros suggests that a speaker who starts an answer with so “is saying what he wants to say, like a politician—but trying to make it sound like it’s an answer to the question.”

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/when-so ... -annoying/

"PR consultant Cherry Chapell, on the other hand, sees this use of so as “a good way of giving yourself time to think.”' :naughty:
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby PufPuf93 » Mon Jan 09, 2017 3:56 pm

Yea!! I have electricity again and propane is scheduled to be filled Wednesday (propane works for stovetop and oven for now but propane generator won't sustain power.

My landline still works during power outages as it is very robust as being a local maybe 300 customer network in and on the fringes of a small valley where there is no connection to the grid, rather a microwave on the mountain above and one receiver in the valley installed in the 1970s. As of 2017, there is no local cell phone access. Internet was only by satellite except for several wifi hot spots by Tribal and Federal offices until Summer 2016 (some cells can be used in wifi areas if one has an internet account). In Summer 2016 a small wifi tower was installed that beams to the valley and plans for some cable internet in some neighborhoods. I am sticking with satellite as while somewhat more expensive, it is faster and has a higher download allowance. I have friends that live about a 15 mile drive on a county highway that are off the telephone and electrical grid on an Indian Allotment. Their phone, relatively new to them, they used my phone here for some years, is a satellite phone as is their internet. They have had power for about 5 years from a combination pilton wheel on their water, solar, batteries, and diesel generation. They had a small gas generation prior that was used intermittently. Ironically the main coaxial internet line between Oregon and California is buried under the county highway in front of their Allotment. There is no local access to the line anywhere locally.

I have an old friend who lives about 2 a two hour drive away, also in the mountains and at a much higher elevation (2000 feet above sea level there, 500 feet here) but his town his much larger with more services and closer to civilization. So we talked don the phone a lot during this last outage and I told him of my belief that the electricity outages lasted longer and were frequent than in the past and my theory why. Until the 1970s the local highway was narrow, often not a full two lanes and windy (still is very windy), and with frequent winter rock slides (that also still occur). However, the power poles were shorter and located on or directly adjacent to the road prism and frequently criss-crossed the curvy highway. As the road was widened and straightened (essentially finished by 1980 and many would still call much of the highway narrow and windy), larger poles with longer spans were installed for power in cleared right of ways separate from the highway. My theory being that more material drops on lines that were harder to fix because of the nature of their location. This is especially true as helicopters are required to replace some poles. He agreed with my theory and mentioned a secondary highway near his home with the same problem is that lines were supposedly upgraded but away from the highway and now there is more outages that last longer. I added that I had worked for the Yurok Tribe in 2003 on a project where electric and phone lines were being provided for the first time to part of their Reservation. There was a clearing contract for the right of way. The clearing width and other specifications were generic to the characteristics of the pole and lines and did not reflect tree height nor soil properties but did adjust for slope. Hopefully, such specs have been improved but probably not. We also talked of the internet coaxial line between Oregon and California and realized we knew different unexpected locations where it was installed. Surprisingly it is no where near either the major north south interstates 5 or 101 not near the major electrical grid but on extremely low traffic state, county, or even US Forest Service roads. We thought maybe it was some National Security issue in that it was less likely to be destroyed as major routes in the event of emergency.

So yesterday I got out for the first time in days and traveled to the nearby village with a near neighbor who is a young US Forest Service employee. PG&E had set up a small command center and we saw at least ten pg&e crew vehicles. Already for the past two days one could hear helicopters working. The world look like a war zone with all the downed and broken trees. I pretty much expect more will fall on lines especially four more days of rain are projected and there is much material broken but not yet on the ground. The power has already flickered several times as well.

I mentioned my previous conversation about how there were les power outages in the past and they were fixed easier because of much better access in being immediate to the highway. My ride responded that he had had the same conversation three times in the past several days in that the electrical pole "improvement" had resulted in more and more prolonged outages. One other difference that we did not specifically mention was that pg&e had many more offices with equipment more local but now there may be more repair equipment it located farther away for dispatch. Also this mobile command center is new to me and, as a USFS employee, he had a tour and was shown various electronic diagnostics now in use but not available in the past.
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby 82_28 » Mon Jan 09, 2017 5:22 pm

There are these main electricity lines near me and this kid, some bartender, on his way home decided to climb one one night. He was fried. You can't get within like ten feet without them zapping you, not even touching them. Electricity just leaps out at you. It blew him away. He died. They had to shut down the whole grid to even get him. Landlines I believe work on a constant 6 volt current. I think. Apparently it changes when it is raining and goes up. Again, don't quote me on anything ever, unless you want to. :clown
There is no me. There is no you. There is all. There is no you. There is no me. And that is all. A profound acceptance of an enormous pageantry. A haunting certainty that the unifying principle of this universe is love. -- Propagandhi
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby brekin » Mon Jan 09, 2017 5:28 pm

Cordelia » Mon Jan 09, 2017 1:07 pm wrote:
Business consultant Hunter Thurman gives three reasons for avoiding the practice of beginning a sentence with so:

1. “So” insults your audience.
2. “So undermines your credibility.
3. “So” demonstrates that you’re not 100% comfortable with what you’re saying.

PR consultant Cherry Chapell, on the other hand, sees this use of so as “a good way of giving yourself time to think.”
Linguistics professor Penelope Gardner-Chloros suggests that a speaker who starts an answer with so “is saying what he wants to say, like a politician—but trying to make it sound like it’s an answer to the question.”

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/when-so ... -annoying/
"PR consultant Cherry Chapell, on the other hand, sees this use of so as “a good way of giving yourself time to think.”' :naughty:


Yes, can't stand "So". I agree with #1, in the sense when you start with "So" it seems you can often be implying that 1. Yeah, what you said is fine but let me draw the necessary/obvious conclusion for you and all of us, or
2. basically restating what they are saying in clearer terms, "So, (what you are really saying or meaning is) we should all go there first?"

I don't know if this one has been covered before?
Those old order 8 cassettes for a dollar clubs/rackets by mail, they were pretty awesome.

It's a Steal! How Columbia House Made Money Giving Away Music

Image

If you grew up in the pre-MP3 era, chances are you had at least one go-round as a member of Columbia House’s mail-order music club. Who could turn down the allure of eight compact discs (or 11 record albums or cassette tapes) for just a penny? It would be stupid not to join up! A few months of automatic shipments later, you probably ended up like a lot of members did: as a no-income 14-year-old who owed Columbia House $47 for unwanted Sir Mix-a-Lot CDs. Let’s take a look at a few lingering questions about the music club.
How did the Columbia House business model work?

The underlying model for Columbia House was a pretty simple setup known as negative option billing. Basically, once you sign up for a membership in a club or service, you start getting monthly shipments unless you expressly tell the club you don’t want them. Of course, you also get the bill.
Negative option billing has actually been illegal in Ontario since 2005, but it’s still legal in the United States. There are a few caveats, though. The Federal Trade Commission requires that any club or service offering a negative option plan must clearly and conspicuously indicate minimum purchase obligations, cancellation procedures, the frequency with which members must reject shipments, and how to eventually cancel a membership when they enroll new members.

The FTC really drops the hammer on any company that doesn’t comply with these regulations. In 2009 it reached a $1 million settlement with the online company Commerce Planet, which had been offering a “free” online auction kit while also signing customers up for a recurring $59.95 “online supplier” program.
How did Columbia House make any money while giving away so much music?
Columbia House and competitor BMG brought in tons of gross revenue — as late as 2000, the two companies were grossing $1.5 billion a year. But even with negative option billing bringing in cash from club members who forgot to return their rejection forms, Columbia House operated on a seemingly tight margin.
Columbia House and BMG had some fairly clever ways to save cash, though. Until 2006, the record companies had never actually secured written licenses to distribute the records they sent to club members. Instead, the clubs saved the hassle (and the expense) by paying most publishers 75% of the standard royalties set by copyright law. The clubs argued that since the publishers were cashing their discounted checks, they were submitting to “implied” licenses.

Music publishers didn’t love this arrangement, but for decades it was pretty tough to fight back against the mail-order clubs. As some of the biggest pre-Internet retailers, the clubs held enormous power over the music market. According to a 2006 Billboard article, if a publisher complained, the clubs would simply stop carrying their records.
On top of that, the clubs generally weren’t buying their records from labels and then selling them. Instead, the clubs would acquire the master tapes of records and press their own copies on the cheap. Moreover, remember those “bonus” or “free” records you got for signing up for the clubs? The clubs generally didn’t pay any royalties at all on those, which further slashed their costs.

In the end, all these little factors saved a ton of money. In his 2004 book The Recording Industry, Geoffrey P. Hull took a look at the economics of the clubs. He estimated that the cost to the clubs of a “free” disc was only around $1.50, while a disc sold at full price cost the club anywhere from $3.20 to $5.50. Hull did the math and realized that even if only one of every three discs a club distributed sold at the $16 list price, the club would still end up making a margin of around $7.20 on each sold disc. Hull explains that retail stores were hard pressed to make a margin of even $6.50 per sold disc, so it’s easy to see how the clubs stayed afloat even with their massive marketing and advertising costs.
Did anyone really, really take advantage of those introductory offers?
Joseph Parvin of Lawrenceville, NJ, was undoubtedly the patron saint of anyone who ever wanted to stick it to a music club for receiving an unwanted record.
In March 2000, the 60-year-old Parvin admitted that he had used 16 post office boxes and his own home address to fleece Columbia House and BMG out of 26,554 discs during a five-year span in the '90s. He pleaded guilty to a single count of mail fraud.

Oddly, the New York Times story on Parvin’s plea included a story of another scammer who was nearly as prolific. Just five months earlier, David Russo pleaded guilty to stockpiling 22,000 CDs using a similar scheme. He then sold the booty at flea markets.
What about Columbia House’s old rival, BMG?
This may come as a shock to your circa-1994 self, but Columbia House and BMG are part of the same company now. In 2002 Columbia House’s then-owners, Sony and AOL Time Warner, sold a majority stake of the company to the Blackstone Group. (Sony and AOL maintained a 15 percent share between them.)
In 2005, Blackstone again flipped Columbia House to the German media giant Bertelsmann, the owner of BMG, for a reported $400 million. After a series of further transactions, Columbia House is now situated in the portfolio of Direct Brands, Inc., a direct marketer whose other holdings include the Book-of-the-Month Club.
Can I still order music from Columbia House?

You’re a few years too late. The merged version of Columbia House and BMG, the BMG Music Group, quit selling music on June 30, 2009. (Apparently digital music wasn’t just some silly fad.) Direct Brands still operates a business under the Columbia House name, but don’t expect the latest music to show up at your door. The revamped company sells DVDs and Blu-Ray discs.
* * *
Did any of you end up owing way too much money to a music club? Do you remember your first eight CDs?

http://mentalfloss.com/article/28036/it ... away-music
If I knew all mysteries and all knowledge, and have not charity, I am nothing. St. Paul
I hang onto my prejudices, they are the testicles of my mind. Eric Hoffer
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby Cordelia » Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:35 pm



I'd forgotten all about Bryan Adams; Sooo 1980's :thumbsup


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s6TtwR2Dbjg
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby brekin » Mon Jan 09, 2017 7:53 pm



This is more 1991 Bryan Adams, but reminds me of something you don't see anymore. "Dark" movies that really are pretty tame interpretations in the post-Nolan era.

The "dark" version of Robin Hood.

If I knew all mysteries and all knowledge, and have not charity, I am nothing. St. Paul
I hang onto my prejudices, they are the testicles of my mind. Eric Hoffer
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Re: Things/Behaviors You Don't See Anymore

Postby Blue » Mon Jan 09, 2017 8:09 pm

I listened to Houses of the Holy on 8 track. Then I carried around a box of cassette tapes in my truck forever. Funny, I drive a 2003 Toyota and it actually has a cassette player in it...must have been the last year they put them in.

Common courtesy seems to have disappeared in public spaces. Especially from drivers. I remember when truckers used to be helpful by allowing you to pass on a hill instead of hogging the road side by side like they do now. They even flashed their lights when a pig was hiding up ahead.
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