Idle No More

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Re: Idle No More

Postby Handsome B. Wonderful » Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:08 pm

Wombaticus Rex » Thu Oct 17, 2013 6:49 pm wrote:Is Idle No More related to the New Brunswick blockade violence today? Raw media on Twitter was f'ing impressive, looks like a barely contained war zone there right now.


Not sure.

What I see happening there is simply some people who don't want the land destroyed through peaceful protest. This peaceful protest is being answered with brute force. Unneccessary brute force.

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Re: Idle No More

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:50 pm

40 arrested at N.B. anti-fracking protest after it turns violent

FIRST POSTED: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 12:47 PM EDT | UPDATED: THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 03:20 PM EDT
UN check-in on Canadian Natives ends


HALIFAX - Mounties have arrested at least 40 protesters at an anti-fracking blockade in New Brunswick after police cruisers were torched when RCMP moved in.

Charges include firearms offences, uttering threats, intimidation, mischief, and refusing to abide by a court injunction.

Native protesters hit with rubber bullets and pepper spray apparently retaliated by torching at least five cop cars.

Mounties said at least one shot was fired by someone other than police, and Molotov cocktails were thrown at cops.

The RCMP is also investigating other suspected explosive devices.

Mounties were trying to enforce an Oct. 3 court injunction against the standoff near Rexton, where SWN Resources Canada is testing for shale gas.

Elsipogtog Mi'kmaq First Nation members have been blocking workers' access to their trucks.

The protesters have been there since Sept. 30.

"The RCMP has worked diligently with all parties involved in hopes for a peaceful resolution. Those efforts have not been successful," RCMP Const. Jullie Rogers-Kent said in a release.

A video posted online shows protesters cursing at cops and daring them to release their police dogs while others yelled that there were elders and children present.

Other videos show a line of police stretched across Hwy. 11, moving slowly to contain the protest, and protesters washing out their eyes from what appeared to be pepper spray.

The area is still closed to traffic and police remain on the scene amid the "large gathering" of protesters.

The provincial government in the spring cautiously opened the door for shale gas exploration, while promising to defend environmental concerns. It hinted a regulatory commission could oversee development.

The protesters are concerned the process to extract natural gas by fracturing deep underground rock could damage the environment and contaminate their drinking water.

— with files from Kris Sims


https://twitter.com/stimulator/status/3 ... 88/photo/1
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Re: Idle No More

Postby American Dream » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:18 pm

UPDATE: Mik’maq Resist! 6 RCMP Cars Torched, Fracking Equipment Confiscated
from Earth First! News, Oct 17, 2013


Image
Warrior stands in front of burning RCMP vehicles, New Brunswick, Oct 17, 2013.


In retaliation against a violent police raid this morning on a peaceful First Nations blockade, Mik’maq warriors and supporters have fought back.

The RCMP appear to have arrested journalist Miles Howe, who has been reporting on the Elsipogtog struggle against the illegal gas grab on indigenous lands. More than 200 RCMP are participating in the raid, including snipers in fatigues. Ambulances have been prevented from treating protestors wounded by pepper spray, plastic bullets, and general brutality.

Image
RCMP snipers during operation against anti-fracking blockade, Oct 17, 2013.

As of the time of writing this, six RCMP vehicles have been torched, and melees of stones have been hurled in response to tear gas, plastic bullets, and pepper spray from the RCMP. Mik’maq allies have also confiscated fracking equipment in continued efforts to maintain the blockade against the gas company.

Blockades are reportedly springing up elsewhere throughout Mik’maq territory, as news has spread of police brutality and unnecessary use of force against peaceful protestors, including elders and children. Idle No More’s twitter account has called on all the Sacred Fires of the World, and solidarity demos in DC, NYC, Vancouver, BC, and Winnipeg have already been announced.

The Mik’maq Blockade has cost the gas company an estimated $50,000 per day, and has been ongoing for two weeks. Today’s crack down is a direct betrayal of a peace process ongoing between the Elsipogtog and the New Brunswick premier, and a violation of the rights of Indigenous Peoples as according to the UN. The government of Canada has instigated a major diplomatic incident, and global solidarity is coming in from countries around the world.

The whole world is watching!


Image

http://earthfirstjournal.org/newswire/2 ... nfiscated/
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Re: Idle No More

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:24 pm

Canada
UPDATE: Canadians Unite to Stop Fracking in New Brunswick - POLICE ARRIVE WITH TEAR GAS
By Sam Koplinka-Loehr, Common Dreams
Common Dreams
Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013

UPDATE: Police moved in with tear gas, more than 40 arrested so far [per CBC News early in the afternoon October 17 - see details here. ]


A community meeting at the encampment in Rexton, New Brunswick. (Photo: WNV / Carolyn Gray)


For the past two weeks, an unprecedented coalition of Acadians, Anglophones and members of the Elsipogtog First Nation have blockaded a compound in the Canadian town of Rexton, New Brunswick, where trucks and equipment used in the process of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, are stored. The company that owns the facility — SWN Resources Canada — has been working all summer to conduct seismic tests as the first step in the fracking process. While the natural gas derived from the drilling would primarily be sold over the border in the United States, the impacts of extraction — namely polluted water and air — would be felt in these communities for generations to come.

In New Brunswick, the provincial government owns all underground mineral and gas rights. The local people have little influence over their own land. In some cases, citizens only receive a written notice within 24 hours of seismic testing and drilling on their land. Realizing their lack of legal power in the decision-making process, impacted landowners began organizing in New Brunswick’s Kent County about three years ago, when shale gas companies moved in to start exploration. Groups like Our Environment, Our Choice and Upriver Environment Watch began educational campaigns — including speaking tours, lobbying the provincial and local governments, and public actions such as a blue ribbon campaign for clean water, where activists tied ribbons along the major roads in the area to publicize the issue.

Denise Vautour, a local Acadian, got involved in the Upriver group after seeing the 2010 anti-fracking documentary Gasland. As a retired medical social worker, Vautour has focused on what she perceives as the immorality of exposing the populous to fracking. While the industry has claimed in local public meetings that fracking fluid is safe enough to drink, Vautour believes they are lying. Beyond the obvious carcinogens in fracking fluid, she has argued that even the best medical reports still need years-worth of evidence before the longterm effects of fracking on human and ecological health can be determined.

Three months ago, Latour submitted evidence to the province surrounding the moral complications of continuing to pollute water and air without prior and informed consent. However, she has yet to receive a response because government offices are sifting through thousands of submissions from New Brunswick residents in opposition to fracking.

Even with such widespread opposition, the sentiment at the encampment is that more people should be taking action on the ground in order to make a difference. While at times the camp swells to a few hundred people — such as during press conferences or mealtimes — it dwindles again during the cold nights to around 20 people. Independent of numbers, though, the coalition is dedicated and has thus far forced SWN to spend tens of millions of dollars more than expected.

“If all we are going to be is a nuisance,” said Vautour, “then we are going to be the best darn nuisance that we know how to be.”



Since the beginning of the summer, the Mi’kmaq sacred fire has become a place for French-speaking Acadians, Anglophones and members of the Elsipogtog First Nation to gather and organize actions. It was around this ceremonial fire that people from all three groups built their alliances, learning to work and pray together. Despite the cruel history between settlers and natives, all parties have joined together to become nonviolent protectors of the water and land, meeting the fracking industry at every turn — monitoring, blockading and otherwise putting their bodies on the line to stop shale gas development.

Much of the activism so far has focused on blocking the so-called “thumper” trucks, which send vibrations through the ground — similar to an earthquake — to help determine where to drill. In June and July, 30 people were arrested for blocking backwoods testing sites. On July 24, after months of direct action, as well as standoffs with the police, the Geptin of the Mi’gmag Grand Council — the pre-contact traditional form of government in Mi’kma’ki that still exists today — issued an eviction notice to SWN.

Following negotiations between the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and representatives of Elsipogtog First Nation and the Mi’kmaq Warriors Society, SWN agreed to stop testing in the backwoods of New Brunswick at the end of July, and announced it would resume in mid-September with testing in lower lying areas. But the encampment that began two weeks ago has thus far prevented SWN from proceeding. Employees may be attempting dynamite testing elsewhere, but the activists in Rexton and the neighboring towns are paying close attention, waiting for any sign of activity.

The response from SWN, the provincial government and the mainstream media has not been favorable. Even though every action so far has been nonviolent, much of the attention has focused on the Warriors Society, which plans to use any means necessary to stop fracking on Mi’kmaq territory. SWN refused to meet in person with the blockaders, choosing instead to file a civil injunction for the forced removal of the encampment.



Most days at the encampment now include a talking circle, where every person has a chance to speak their mind and suggest ideas for moving forward. Many of the conversations focus on strengthening the alliances between groups and working together. However, some questions remain. How will the community respond if the injunction is served? Is SWN continuing testing in other areas while the blockade is underway? What is the best strategy to end fracking here in New Brunswick once and for all?

To answer these questions, people are grounding themselves in the sacred. The Eight Women of the Eighth Fire are a group of Mi’kmaq women who have come together to provide guidance. The women honor both the Mi’kmaq tradition of female leadership as well as the Seven Fires Prophesy — first heard by the Mi’kmaq and Anishinaabe peoples — which states that if enough people from all races and creeds turn from the life of extreme materialism, then environmental and social catastrophe will be averted. Using ceremony and prayer, the Eight Women will help guide decision-making and honor the reasons that brought people together in this struggle — to protect the water, the earth, treaty rights, indigenous sovereignty and harmony between the races.

While the way forward has many unknowns, the people that gather daily at the encampment remain positive. Earlier this month, dozens of students from a nearby school left class to support the encampment, joining the crowd in chants and songs.

“People need to be more aware that they can change things,” said Raven Chanelle, a First Nations youth activist, who rallied the students from her school. “It’s not up to the government, it’s up to the people.”

This firm, but cheerful outlook is guiding the Elsipogtog community and their allies in the struggle to halt fracking in New Brunswick and — perhaps just as importantly — overcome the ugly history between settler and native groups. For evidence of such progress, one need only look at two signs placed close to one another at the encampment. One reads, “SWN, Returnez Chez-vous!” while the other says, “Frack Off!”


Sam Koplinka-Loehr is a graduate of Middlebury College in Vermont with a major in Environmental Justice. His research and writing focuses on community empowerment, indigenous solidarity and environmental justice.
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Re: Idle No More

Postby justdrew » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:29 pm

By 1964 there were 1.5 million mobile phone users in the US
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Re: Idle No More

Postby Carol Newquist » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:31 pm

It looks to me that Canada is every bit the authoritarian police state the U.S. is. When push comes to shove, and their profits and property are threatened, they respond with overwhelming merciless and brutal force. It looks like a scene from the streets of Egypt or Syria, but the media will spin it in an exceptional way in order to mitigate comparisons by groggy sheep. Those snipers are sick cowards. The bullets are rubber for now. In ten, twenty years, don't count on it.
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Re: Idle No More

Postby Wombaticus Rex » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:36 pm

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Re: Idle No More

Postby justdrew » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:43 pm



thought it might be of interest :wink
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Re: Idle No More

Postby Carol Newquist » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:44 pm



It looks like an interesting read from a cursory review, but I have to ask, how is it relevant to the brutalization of these protesters? Their brutalization isn't an act of subversion, it's an act of state-sponsored hot evil. Also, if the movement is comprehensive enough in its philosophy and approach, meaning right scope, right time, and right place, these methods of subversion would be feckless, and in fact only serve to strengthen it in the form of blow back.
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Re: Idle No More

Postby seemslikeadream » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:46 pm

thanks jd
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Re: Idle No More

Postby Wombaticus Rex » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:54 pm

Carol Newquist » Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:44 pm wrote:It looks like an interesting read from a cursory review, but I have to ask, how is it relevant to the brutalization of these protesters?


It is a post-Occupy treatise on how LEO deals with real, viable social movements and, given the venue, has almost certainly been read by the RCMP officials in charge of dealing with Idle No More.

Carol Newquist » Thu Oct 17, 2013 3:44 pm wrote:Their brutalization isn't an act of subversion, it's an act of state-sponsored hot evil.


I think you are plainly re-stating a euphemism there rather than making a real distinction. No?
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Re: Idle No More

Postby Luther Blissett » Thu Oct 17, 2013 4:59 pm

6 RCMP cars torched, fracking equipment liberated.

http://earthfirstjournal.org/newswire/2 ... nfiscated/

In retaliation against a violent police raid this morning on a peaceful First Nations blockade, Mi’kmaq warriors and supporters have fought back.

The RCMP appear to have arrested journalist Miles Howe, who has been reporting on the Elsipogtog struggle against the illegal gas grab on indigenous lands. More than 200 RCMP are participating in the raid, including snipers in fatigues. Ambulances have been prevented from treating protestors wounded by pepper spray, plastic bullets, and general brutality.

As of the time of writing this, six RCMP vehicles have been torched, and melees of stones have been hurled in response to tear gas, plastic bullets, and pepper spray from the RCMP. Mi’kmaq allies have also confiscated fracking equipment in continued efforts to maintain the blockade against the gas company.

Blockades are reportedly springing up elsewhere throughout Mi’kmaq territory, as news has spread of police brutality and unnecessary use of force against peaceful protestors, including elders and children. Idle No More’s twitter account has called on all the Sacred Fires of the World, and solidarity demos in DC, NYC, Vancouver, BC, and Winnipeg have already been announced.

The Mi’kmaq Blockade has cost the gas company an estimated $50,000 per day, and has been ongoing for two weeks. Today’s crack down is a direct betrayal of a peace process ongoing between the Elsipogtog and the New Brunswick premier, and a violation of the rights of Indigenous Peoples as according to the UN. The government of Canada has instigated a major diplomatic incident, and global solidarity is coming in from countries around the world.

The whole world is watching!
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Re: Idle No More

Postby Luther Blissett » Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:22 pm

…The mainstream media is now focussing on the burning RCMP cars. This is part of the strategy that will garner support from 'regular Canadians' for the violent actions of the RCMP. But the mainstream media has not reported on the firing of the rubber bullets, the police brutality, tear gas - and they will not disclose how many RCMP they have on site. Nor will they highlight that our people there are peaceful and armed with drums, songs and prayers.…


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Re: Idle No More

Postby Carol Newquist » Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:38 pm

I think you are plainly re-stating a euphemism there rather than making a real distinction. No?


No, it's stating the obvious, articulately. What's going on right now, in the streets with the Idle No More and RCMP, is exactly as I described. It's not subversion per that manual. Subversion means clandestine....not readily identifiable, the presence and strategy of it must be detected by indirect means. Snipers shooting these unarmed protesters with rubber bullets is not a form of subversion. However, if you or justdrew want to make the argument that, like in Toronto a few years ago, provocateurs have joined the Idle No More protesters under the aegis of support, but in reality, they've done so to vandalize and provoke a police response, well then, that's another story. Is that what you and justdrew are contending as it relates to what's transpiring with this protest turned into a turkey shoot by cowardly and sadistic snipers? Is that the reason for the subversion pamphlet link?
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Re: Idle No More

Postby Carol Newquist » Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:42 pm

Luther Blissett » Thu Oct 17, 2013 5:22 pm wrote:
…The mainstream media is now focussing on the burning RCMP cars. This is part of the strategy that will garner support from 'regular Canadians' for the violent actions of the RCMP. But the mainstream media has not reported on the firing of the rubber bullets, the police brutality, tear gas - and they will not disclose how many RCMP they have on site. Nor will they highlight that our people there are peaceful and armed with drums, songs and prayers.…


Exactly, Luther. This supports what I said above and how it would obviously be spun by the media so comparisons to the streets of Egypt and Syria aren't made. Exceptionalism at its best.
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